Volume of a Sphere Teacher Resources

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Learners experiment to understand the volume of a sphere. In this volume lesson, pupils create spheres, fill them, and then find the volume of their spheres. Everyone calculates the inside of planets.
The formula for the volume of a sphere is volume equals four-thirds pi times the radius cubed. That's a mouth-full. But if you are given the radius value of the sphere, all you have to do is plug it in and do the arithmetic. Just remember to use the order of operations.
In this geometry worksheet, 10th graders determine the volume of a sphere, given the diameter or the radius. The one page interactive worksheet contains eight questions. Hints, clues, and answers are provided.
The formula for the volume of a sphere is - volume equals four thirds pi times the radius cubed. That's a mouth-full. But if you are given the radius value of the sphere, all you have to do is plug it in and do the arithmetic. Just remember to use order of operation.
A big ice cream cone is the perfect representation of a a mathematical sphere and cone. The activity asks learners to determine whether the scoop of ice cream can fit inside the cone if packed in. If not, construct a new cone that will fit the scoop of ice cream and be a reasonable size. There can be multiple correct answers so let your class decide which cone is their favorite!
The formula of a sphere is related to the formula of a cylinder? How? Oh, radius and pi. Watch this video and observe how the instructor illustrates just how these two formulas are connected. Then plug in the known values and solve this problem.
The volume of various solids is explored in five sections with the last being eight example problems including step-by-step solutions. Using Cavalieri’s principle and easy-to-follow direct instructions with colored pictures, the first section defines volume, the second explores the volume of a right rectangular prism and related solids, expanding to a general formula for the volume of any prism. The third explains the formula used to find the volume of square pyramids by slicing up a right rectangular prism into small pyramids. Finally, the volume formula of a sphere is neatly derived.
Provide your class some practice with the dimensions of geometric figures. Here you have a set of three different-shaped, stemmed drinking glasses with diameters and heights provided. Math-minded individuals calculate the volume of each. Offer up a toast to the learner who first answers correctly!
Mathematicians analyze the relationships between surface area and volume. They conduct Internet research, conduct various experiments, record the data in a spreadsheet, and graph the results and compare the rate of increase of surface area to the rate of increase of volume.
In this moon's atmosphere instructional activity, learners read about the tenuous lunar atmosphere and solve 4 problems. They find the density of helium particles, they find the grams of given atoms in the moon's atmosphere and they find the volume and mass of the lunar atmosphere.
Students calculate the surface area and volume of a sphere. In this geometry lesson plan, students define nets, surface areas and volume of prisms, pyramids, cylinders and cones. They use the computer to create nets and analyze shapes.
Students solve volume problems. In this geometry lesson, the class watches a video about clean water (link provided) and individuals compare the volume of different prisms, including an actual drinking glass. Extension activities include research on organizations that provide safe drinking water and the volume of the containers they use.
In this mathematical model of the sun worksheet, students read about the way scientists use the sun's radius and mass to determine a mathematical model of the sun using the volume of a sphere, and the relationship between density, volume and mass. Students use an Excel spreadsheet to calculate the volume of the core of the sun and the shell zones.
Learners create three dimensional shapes using concept maps. In this geometry lesson plan, students investigate the impact of mental schemas on humans. They collect data on this topic and plot their data on a coordinate plane.
In this area and volume activity, students find the surface area and volume of given spheres. This one-page activity contains 19 problems.
For this volume and surface area worksheet, students find the volume in each of the ten problems listed and write their measurements in terms of the larger amount. They find the volume of a sphere, a rectangular solid, and a cylinder. Students also determine the surface area of a cube, a sphere, and a right circular cone in the last 3 problems.
Which vase holds more water: a cylinder, sphere, or cone? Figure out which should be used for your sister's birthday bouquet with this practical word problem.
In this moon worksheet, students read about the data collected from the Deep Impact/EPOXI and Cassini missions to the moon that have detected the presence of hydroxyl molecules under the moon's polar craters. Students solve 4 problems and determine the surface volume of the moon, the metric tons of regolith on the moon, and the liters and gallons of water that could be recovered from the moon.
In this geometry worksheet, 10th graders find the volume and surface area of a sphere and a figure composed of a cylinder and a hemisphere.  The one page interactive worksheet contains five multiple choice questions and is self checking. 
Tenth graders change numbers written in standard form to scientific notation. In this scientific notation lesson, 10th graders use given diameters and distances from the sun for each planet in our solar system. After rewriting each of the numbers in scientific notation, students answer six comprehension questions.

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Volume of a Sphere