War Teacher Resources

Find War educational ideas and activities

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Students explore the reasons why the United States became involved in World War II and considers the reasons Japan decided to attack Pearl Harbor. They view a detailed interactive map showing the events at Pearl Harbor.
Students examine the past fifty years of NATO, focusing specifically on NATO's involvement and actions in conflicts around the world and the results of their involvement.
Students explore why the United States became involved in the war in Korea. They discuss the confict between Truman and MacArthur, culminating in the latter's dismissal from command. They identify on a world map foreign countires associated with the Korean War.
Students learn basic facts about the Supreme Court by examining the United States Constitution and one of the landmark cases decided by that court.
Students examine the wars the United States was involved in between 1898 and 1945. In groups, they determine the causes and effects of each war and how each war changed the way the United States handled their foreign affairs. As a class, they debate American imperialism and how we have used it to our advantage in each war.
Students examine the causes and the Korean War. In this Cold War lesson, students discover how the United States became involved in the Korean War and determine how it became a "flashpoint" in the Cold War. Students complete a worksheet activity.
Students share their own thoughts about the United States' involvement in Iraq. They read an article about what the Democrats would do if they were in charge. They develop a poll for members of their community to take and analyze the results. They draft a letter to a candidate who is running for office.
Invite your class to reflect on the responsibility of newspapers to act as vehicles for citizens to voice their opinions. Using an article to gain factual info. about gov't strategies in dealing with current events in Kosovo, learners write Voices articles discussing their opinion on the United States' involvement in the conflict in Kosovo.
ELLs are introduced to the experiences of Filipino immigrants to the United States. As a class, they discuss the various waves of immigration to the United States and state the reasons why they would leave the Philippines. They compare timelines of Filipino and Puerto Rican immigration and consider two case studies of Filipino immigrants. To end the lesson, they research their own family's immigration story. Some materials are missing in this resource, so it will needed to be supplemented.
Students investigate the Cold War and why it was fought in Guatemala. In this Cold War instructional activity, students analyze documents from the CIA and textbooks then discuss. Students work in pairs to answer questions and fill out graphic organizers.
Students analyze the feelings of Americans regarding the Vietnam War. In this Vietnam War lesson, students collaborate to research Internet and print sources regarding the perspectives on U.S. involvement in the war. Students participate in a simulation that requires them to consider how they would react to being called to service in Vietnam.
Students explore the reasons the United States became involved in World War I.  For this World History lesson, students research the reasons Woodrow Wilson made the decisions he did, prepare a debate and write a paper.
A highly engaging warm-up activity kicks off this plan for teaching class members about the Vietnam War. After the anticipatory activity, the teacher chooses the means by which to provide an overview of the war (PowerPoint, lecture, textbook, etc.). Next, 11th graders answer a series of questions to ensure a fundamental understanding. Lastly, individuals receive a timeline strip with a particular event that they research. On paper, they create a description/depiction of the event and place it in chronological order with the other posters. All of the necessary resources are included.
Using an incredibly engaging activity and detailed lesson plan, your learners will serve as advisors to President Madison on whether to participate in what would become the War of 1812! Utilize a variety of effective instructional strategies to acquaint your class with the causes of the war. There are opportunities for group work and independent practice, analysis of primary sources, and written or performance assessments.
Students comprehend how the United States became involved in what one historian called the quagmire. Students identify and analyze the importance of the Tet Offensive in turning American public opinion against the Vietnam War. Students identify how the Vietnam War is still a vital part of American life and culture. Students encourage active learning by holding an in-class debate between pro- and anti-war views.
Students study all about George Washington: Farmer, Soldier, and First President of the United States of America on the internet.
Eleventh graders reconsider the events leading to U.S. entry into World War I through the lens of archival documents.
Learners compare the histories of Japan and the United States by creating horizontal time lines of the two countries. They conduct research via the internet and available text books to complete their time line. The class discusses the similarities and differences of the two cultures.
Students explore some of the potential future targets in the war against terrorism. Groups investigate the history of terrorism in Somalia, Yemen, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Iraq.
Students explore how empires around the globe have impacted the world in which they have existed. They analyze whether or not the United States is an imperialist nation and create their own empires based on their understanding of empires in history.