Water Cycle Teacher Resources

Find Water Cycle educational ideas and activities

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Seventh graders examine the water cycle and its relationship to weather around the world.  In this weather events lesson students study the water cycle and how it impacts weather.
Students study the stages of the water cycle and evaporation. In this water cycle lesson, students read Water Cycles and color a diagram of the water cycle. Students review related terms and sing a song about the Water Cycle. Students then complete a water cycle experiment to study evaporation.
Students study the path and forms of water through Earth. In this water cycle instructional activity, students role-play water as it moves throughout the Earth. Students play the water cycle game and complete various stations to learn about water forms and its path.
Second graders discover the components of the water cycle. In this water cycle lesson plan, 2nd graders view a PowerPoint and bulletin board, read a book, and sing a song to learn more. Students complete a K-W-L chart at the end of the lesson plan. 
Present the water cycle to your middle schoolers with this activity. After an anticipatory set, they participate in a Q & A session about the terms associated with the water cycle: evaporation, transpiration, condensation, and precipitation. Once they have reviewed terms, they go to the computer lab to print a graphic of the water cycle. To wrap-up, learners think about what water has been around to experience. This activity is straightforward, but not highly interactive or engaging.
Sixth graders recognize that a water cycle is a repeated pattern of change. The lesson is designed to help students theorize how the water cycle recycles the earth's water supply. They illustrate and identify the steps in the water cycle.
Young scholars explore the water cycle and wade through the facts and vocabulary associated with it.
Students examine the water cycle and trace the flow of energy produced. Heat transfer operating in each process of the water cycle is identified. The learner investigates the role of the Sun in the processes.
Students explore the water cycle. In this earth science instructional activity, students read the book Water Dance by Thomas Locker and use an interactive whiteboard to view the website www.epa.gov/safewater/kids/flash/flash_watercycle.html . Students review the water cycle on the website.
Are you studying the water cycle in your class? If so, consider this lesson that includes several project ideas. After going over vocabulary and forming hypotheses about the water cycle, scientists get into groups and choose 1 of 3 projects to complete. Learners have the option to draw a cartoon of the water cycle, create flashcards, or use a digital camera to take pictures that represent the different parts of the water cycle. Handout links do not function.
Students take an imaginary journey through the water cycle. In this water cycle instructional activity, students identify the various parts of the water cycle, listen while their teacher leads them on an imaginary journey through the water cycle, and discuss what they learned.
Young scientists explore Earth elements by conducting an experiment. They define water vocabulary terms such as condensation and precipitation. In addition, they conduct a water experiment in which they build a terrarium, so they can observe a smaller scale water cycle in their class.
Third graders sing a piggyback song to explore the parts of the water cycle and then illustrate and label the water cycle in their science journals.
Third graders explore the different stages of the water cycle.
Third graders use the Internet to research the water cycle and then draw and label its parts. They use their research to write a paragraph on the water cycle.
Students watch a video about the water cycle. They discuss the water cycle and write a story in their science journal about a drop of water going through the water cycle.
Seventh graders discover how water circulates through the earth and its atmosphere while determine how much of the Earth's water is suitable for drinking. They discover the meaning of evaporation, transpiration, and precipitation and draw models of the water cycle.
Young scholars examine the steps of the water cycle and how it influences agriculture. They discuss the different fruits and vegetables grown in their community, and read an article about the water cycle. To wrap up, they create a book illustrating the steps of the water cycle. The article is not included, but it would easily replaced by any article about the water cycle. This would work best for schools located in agricultural areas.
Students explore the water cycle. In groups, students choose a card and then pantomime the picture depicted on the card. Other group members guess the name of the cycle being performed. As a class, students share the numerous ways each water cycle topic was performed.
Second graders explore the water cycle and explain how it works. They create a graphic organizer to show the four steps of the water cycle. The entire class will read "If You Give a Mouse a Cookie" by Laura Numeroff to explain what a cycle is. Then they will watch a video about the water cycle.

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