World History Teacher Resources

Find World History educational ideas and activities

Showing 1 - 20 of 2,907 resources
Students examine periods of time throughout world history. In this time chronology lesson plan, students read and create time lines. Students complete a variety of activities involving the ordering of events in time. 
Students explore the basic elements of Islamic art and create their own artistic calligraphy. In this Islamic art lesson, students discuss calligraphy and watch a video about Islamic art. Students complete a response sheet for the video and an online text for the topic. Students work in groups to further their study of the Islamic art of calligraphy online. Students teach each other about the art, sketch an example of the Tughra, practice the Arabic alphabet, and create their own calligraphy.
Ninth graders examine the importance of geography as it relates to significant events or periods in world history, especially that which pertains to Europe and the United States. They access websites imbedded in this plan to do their research.
Prior to beginning a world history unit, introduce your class members to the essential questions and information included in the unit with a series of interactive learning games. Thirty-four topics are covered, from the Foundations of Civilization, through Life in the Industrial Age, to the World Today.
Students create an illustration of what they believe life under occupation is like. After reading an article, they discuss the dispute over areas in the Middle East, such as the Gaza Strip. Using the internet, they research other occupied land disputes around the world and write letters to the United Nations either supporting or refuting the need for international intervention.
Students build off of their current knowledge of geography and world history, while being introduced to new concepts and ideas.
In this global history and geography standardized test practice worksheet, learners respond to 50 multiple choice, 1 essay, and 15 short answer questions that require them to review their knowledge of world history and geography.
Second graders explore world history by writing newspaper articles. In this Greek history lesson, 2nd graders investigate the geography and society of Ancient Greece by utilizing the Internet as a research tool. Students collaborate with their classmates to create an Ancient Greece newspaper while each student contributes a single article.
Students explore Confucianism and Daoism. In this world history lesson plan, students Compare and contrast the basic tenants of Confucianism and Daoism and identify their influence in Chinese Folktales.
Students talk about the ineffectiveness of the chronological narratives found in world history text books. The Bradley Commission set out guidelines to help improve history textbooks by eliminating all unnecessary information.
Learners explore 6 boxes of stuff about famous people in history including Martin Luther King Jr., Peter the Great, Henry VIII, and more. In this history lesson plan, students then discuss their boxes with the rest of the class.
Fifth graders examine and discuss the concept of chronological order. They research an assigned continent and construct a chronological timeline using a list of historic events.
The big question: How did Russo-Japanese War imagery and the press influence Japanese perception of the war? Learners consider this big question as they compare and contrast various artistic media from the period. The lesson is discussion-based and employs wood block images and streaming video of the Russo-Japanese War as the basis of comparative analysis. Streaming video and image links are included.
What do the members of your class already know about world history? This is a fabulous pre-assessment that will illustrate the varying levels of general world history knowledge among your young historians that you can use to inform your instruction accordingly. Questions involve a range of ideas, from correctly placing important persons and events within the appropriate time frame to listing religions of the world. Tip: Include some time for learners to list as many other world history facts or insights they can recall.
Students reflect on the events before, during and after World War I.  For this World History lesson, students complete a WebQuest that focuses specifically on the key events of World War I.
Tenth graders reflect on the effects of the Holocaust and the events leading up to World War II.  For this World History lesson, 10th graders complete several activities, including a WebQuest, that analyze the Holocaust and its repercussions.
Students identify a pivotal event in world history that they would have liked to have witnessed. They then research this event and write a first-person account of it as if they had been present. Their first-prerson account is modeled after an article they read by Richard Berstein on events in Afghanistan.
Ninth graders differentiate the Native American and European values. In this world history lesson, 9th graders define colonialism in their own words. They study the effects of epidemics and other diseases to Native American populations.
Sixth graders make a hypothesis about the fall of the Roman Empire and then read data sets that show what really happened. In this Roman Empire lesson plan, 6th graders can revise their hypothesis as they read and then explain what really happened in a detailed essay. A solid, thoroughly written World History instructional activity
Ninth graders examine the Nile's role in the birth and growth of Egyptian civilization.  For this World History lesson, 9th graders explore how archaeologists have learned about life in Ancient cities.  Students present a report on their findings.