World History by Continent Teacher Resources

Find World History by Continent educational ideas and activities

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Economic principles and world history are beautifully woven together in this history presentation on medieval Indian Ocean trading. The narrator discusses the unprecedented self-regulation executed by merchants along the Indian Ocean trade routes, as well as reviews the importance of monsoon winds and the spread of products, ideas, and the religion of Islam. 
"To understand the present, we have to imagine the future." In his final video in the series, the narrator discusses an array of considerations tied to globalization, such as the implications of individualism, our impact on the environment and unsustainable use of the planet's resources, and the world's recent dramatic ideological shift in a turn toward democracy. He is able to weave a general reflection of global history into a powerful consideration of humans as historical forces, and prompts learners to see our decisions in a broader context.
"Is capitalism competition natural and good, or should there be systems in place to check it for the sake of our collective well-being?" Explore the complexity and history behind capitalism and socialism in Crash Course World History #33. Though he presents information quickly, Green also extensively dissects these broad economic concepts, highlighting key personalities in their development, terms such as industrial and mercantilism capitalism, as well as class struggle and communism. Tip: Have learners watch the videos once with one central question in mind, and then re-watch the video stopping at various points for class to take notes and discuss concepts.
Students examine periods of time throughout world history. In this time chronology lesson plan, students read and create time lines. Students complete a variety of activities involving the ordering of events in time. 
Here is a set of fantastic project guidelines for a World History research paper, including over 60 possible research topics and guiding questions. Templates for source citations and summaries are included, as well as a very detailed essay rubric. 
Using and online tool called TimeRime, class members create timelines that include what they consider to be the top 10 most important events from the first semester of world history. The first few pages of the assignment focus on how to sign up and use TimeRime. Following the instructions is an assignment page and a 20-point rubric.
Mr. Green provides an overview of Ancient Mesopotamia by examining the political structures and cultural beliefs of the region. The video reviews shifts in authority from religious to political leaders, as well as the influence of cuneiform, Hammurabi's code, and the development of territorial kingdoms and empires. 
This presentation reviews the ins and outs of nineteenth century imperialism. The narrator discusses the colonization of Africa in great detail, and delves into the effects of industrialization, superior technology, and widespread disease on the imperialistic motivations of European powers.
How did the Russia we know today come to take shape? How did the Mongols make a lasting impact on the evolution of Russia? John Green discusses this history, including the nation's early separation from the Byzantine Empire and the reign of Ivan the Terrible in an engaging presentation.
For such a complex and lengthy topic, Mr. Green does a great job of introducing and/or quickly summarizing the major tenets of Indian cultural and religious history, as well as the origins of Buddhism. Topics covered in this episode include the Vedas, caste system, Dharma, the Bhagavad Gita, Siddhartha Guatama, and the Eightfold Path.
This presentation's narrator follows the process of decolonization across nations throughout Afro-Eurasia. First highlighting Gandhi's efforts for independence in British-ruled India, learners are then quickly taken through a series of examples of decolonization, such as in Egypt, Indonesia, the Congo.
What caused, and when was, the fall of the Roman Empire? Find out why the narrator argues the date to be around the middle of the 15th century, or in some ways, to this very day. The video covers Roman efforts to incorporate Germanic warriors into the Roman army, the lack of an emperor after the fifth century, and the rise and impact of the Byzantine empire.
Sixth graders make a hypothesis about the fall of the Roman Empire and then read data sets that show what really happened. In this Roman Empire lesson plan, 6th graders can revise their hypothesis as they read and then explain what really happened in a detailed essay. A solid, thoroughly written World History lesson
Second graders explore world history by writing newspaper articles. In this Greek history lesson, 2nd graders investigate the geography and society of Ancient Greece by utilizing the Internet as a research tool. Students collaborate with their classmates to create an Ancient Greece newspaper while each student contributes a single article.
In the nineteenth episode of a world history series, the narrator explains how the mutually beneficial relationship between the Venetians and the Ottomans led to the Renaissance and Christopher Columbus' voyages. More specifically, your class members will learn about Venetian reliance on trade and merchant ships, coupled with the Ottoman Empire's capture of Egypt and control of trade through the Mediterranean.
In this episode of Crash Course World History, John Green does an excellent job summarizing the reasons behind the ideological clash between the United States and the Soviet Union in the Cold War. Covering early features of the war such as the Marshall Plan and the policy of containment, Green goes on to explore US efforts around the globe to stop the spread of communism, and the lasting implications of those endeavors. Tip: Consider pausing at 2:00 to discuss the magnitude of Green's statement.
Prior to beginning a world history unit, introduce your class members to the essential questions and information included in the unit with a series of interactive learning games. Thirty-four topics are covered, from the Foundations of Civilization, through Life in the Industrial Age, to the World Today.
Students reflect on the events before, during and after World War I.  In this World History lesson plan, students complete a WebQuest that focuses specifically on the key events of World War I.
Listen and analyze as the narrator explains why he identifies World War I as "the war to change all wars". In summarizing the events of the Great War, this episode also details the particular experiences, fears, and motivations of soldiers, the concept of the war as a writers' war, and its major effects on other nations, particularly in the Russian Revolution, emergence of United States as a creditor nation, and the end of the Ottoman Empire.
For this global history and geography standardized test practice worksheet, young scholars respond to 50 multiple choice, 1 essay, and 15 short answer questions that require them to review their knowledge of world history and geography.