World History Teacher Resources

Find World History educational ideas and activities

Showing 81 - 100 of 2,912 resources
Young scholars role-play as invitees to the World's Fair to develop a virtual electronic pavilion or poster presentation about the United States, its history and challenges. They act as tour guides giving their presentations and answering questions.
Tenth graders explore the events that led up to and the outcomes from WW II. They extrapolate from the American experience that democratic ideals often come at a hight price remain vulnerable and are often not valued everywhere in the world.
Ninth graders explore the implications of the Japanese occupation of Korea during World War II. In this World War II lesson, 9th graders read Lost Names: Scenes from a Korean Boyhood or When My Name Was Keoko. Students write book reviews that include plot synopses, cultural settings, and their personal reactions to the literature.
After viewing clips from a documentary on factory work in China and US outsourcing, learners have a fishbowl discussion. They work in groups to build both personal points of view and strong arguments on the effects of outsourcing in China. This lesson includes excellent resources and wonderful discussion questions intended to engage learners in building an economic and global perspective of US business overseas.
A variety of topics and activities make up this presentation, which prompts viewers to answer questions from the Stone Age to the American Revolution. Note: You may find some slides more useful and pertinent than others.
Different cultures and religions explain death and the afterlife in different ways. Upper graders explore and research how the major religions explain death differently. They explore and discuss their own beliefs and how personal ideologies effect how a person behaves or interacts with their community. A great way to build diverse global understanding. 
Students explore how empires around the globe have impacted the world in which they have existed. They analyze whether or not the United States is an imperialist nation and create their own empires based on their understanding of empires in history.
Students research a country leader.
Tenth graders discuss the events leading up to antisemitic behavior in Europe during World War II. Through various activities, 10th graders acquaint themselves with the political ideology of Nazism and assess responsibility for the Holocaust. Materials to complete this unit are included.
Students explore the relationship between a country's political and social history and its position today. They study 8 African countries immersed in the present conflict in Congo. They present their findings.
Students examine the student protests and subsequent massacre at Tiananmen Square in 1989 and the current petition by victims' family members to open a criminal investigation of the responsible officials.
Students research five hundred years of social, economic, territorial, and political history in South Africa, with a focus on the apartheid system. They present their research in the form of a timeline.
Students research and identify how Holocaust events affected lives of real people who lived in Europe from 1933 through 1945 and after, and create original artwork, poetry, and essays that reflect understanding of Holocaust, and its causes and effects.
Learners consider how current events are directly and intricately tied to past events, decisions and other influences. The island of Guam is used as a case study as the events of WWII have continued to affect the people of Guam today.
Students create a History Fair. They examine the National History Day Competition and are encouraged to participate.
Learners examine the instances in history in which groups of people were segregated by race or ethnicity. After reading an article, they discover how apartheid impacted people's attempt to an education. Using the internet, they research various apartheid policies and write a perspective of people who lived in South Africa during these times.
Students read "Saudis Uneasily Balance Desires for Change and Stability" from The New York Times and discuss Saudi Arabia as it considers a change from monarchy to democracy. Students work in groups to research and create timelines on other countries and their histories as they transitioned from one form of government to another.
Students examine the preparations for the invasion of France on June 6, 1944. After viewing a clip from "The War", they identify the demands and concerns of all military leaders for this invasion. They use maps to examine the geographical challenges and discuss the sacrifice of the soliders on that fateful day.
Students read about a protest in France, led by students against the government's labor laws targeting youth. They research student-led protests over the past 50 years and role-play student protesters, reporters, and government officials.
Students explore the modern history, culture, economy, conflicts, social conditions, and geographical boundaries of Armenia and present their findings to fellow classmates at a teach-in.