Critical Reading 

7th - 12th
454 Downloads

What does it mean to read critically? Critical readers look at the author's purpose, attitude, and tone. They draw inferences and identify facts and opinions. Use this guide to help your class become critical readers. Practice opportunities are included. 

Resource Details

Advanced Critical Reading - Columbian Exchange

In this critical reading worksheet, students read a short passage about the Columbian Exchange and then answer questions based on the reading. Students answer questions by making inferences, determining author's point of view and use context clues to determine word meaning.

Advanced Critical Reading: Hubble

In this critical reading worksheet, learners read a passage about the Hubble Telescope and then answer seven questions based on the reading.

Advanced Critical Reading: The Great Debates

In this critical reading instructional activity, students read a passage about The Great Debates between Kennedy and Nixon and answer questions based on the reading.

Advanced Critical Reading: Generations

For this critical reading worksheet, students read a passage about cycles of American generations then answer three questions based on the reading.

Advanced Critical Reading: Salt

In this critical reading worksheet, students read a passage regarding salt then answer three questions based on the reading.

Critical Reading: Pupils' Behavior Has Worsened

In this critical reading exercise, students read an article entitled "Pupils' Behavior Has Worsened."  Students answer multiple choice questions about the reading, correct spelling errors in the article, and answer an essay question in which they give their own opinion of the article.

Critical Reading 

Introduce your readers to informative, non-fiction texts and how to read them successfully. No pictures or practice opportunities are provided, but you could compile a packet of examples to use as your class reads through the presentation. Great information is provided here!

Critical Reading Exercise

In this critical reading exercise, students evaluate the credibility of a piece of writing. Students read descriptions of various interest groups and lobbies and identify the group that made a quotation.

Teach Inferences in a Systematic and Engaging Way

Benefit from specially designed materials to help you teach inference in a systematic and rewarding way!

News and News Analysis: Navigating Fact and Opinion in the Times

Help your class understand the difference between fact and opinion by exploring the New York Times homepage and articles. In pairs or small groups, pupils complete a scavenger hunt, answering the provided questions. Next, discuss the hunt and the idea of interpretive journalism. Finally, class members examine two articles about the same event at the sentence level to compare the mix of fact and opinion. An additional extension idea is included if you want to go deeper into the topic.

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