Fossil Fuels Summary

6th - 8th
113 Downloads

As the title suggests, this is a simply summary of fossil fuels. There are no questions to answer or problems to solve, just notes about fossil fuels. The notes cover how fossil fuels are formed, how we extract it, what humans use it for, and what is produced as a waste product. Keep this for your own use as a guide to your lecture on fossil fuels.

Resource Details

Subject
Earth Science

Fossil Fuels (Part I), The Geology of Oil

Junior geologists work through three mini-lessons that familiarize them with the formation and location of fossil fuels. Part one involves reading about petroleum and where it comes from via a thorough set of handouts. A lab activity follows in part two, in which investigators experiment with the sedimentation of different sized particles. In part three, they will examine maps of the distribution of oil deposits throughout the New York region. Use any one or all three terrific activities as part of your earth science curriculum.

Avoiding Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Burning Fossil Fuels

Chemistry and earth science meet in a lesson on carbon dioxide emissions. After reading about atmospheric problems caused by using fossil fuels, science stars balance equations for the burning of different alkanes. They compute the number of moles of gasses emitted and consider the use of photovoltaics and other clean energy sources. Although it is only a paper and pencil assignment, it is well-written and pertinent when you want to open your chemists' eyes to the threat of climate change.

Avoiding Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Burning Fossil Fuels

High schoolers calculate stoichiometrically the amount of carbon dioxide that would be emitted from burning a mole of varios alkanes that comprise fossile fuels. If the energy released from burning a mole of these alkanes is known, then the amount of carbon dioxide emitted per unit of energy produced can be determined.

Chemical Consequences of Burning Fossil Fuels

Future scientists are introduced to the chemical consequences of burning fossil fuels, learning that fossil fuel combustion leads to the formation of oxides of three nonmetals: carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur, all of which end up in the atmosphere and water. They explore how when each of these oxides are added to water, an acid forms, in addition to threatning wildlife in our streams, lakes, and rivers, acids react with building materials as carbonate containing rocks and some metals.

Fossil Fuels and Its Effects On The World

Students explore the effects of a declining fossil fuel system would have on the world. They read the line graph and other information to answer questions about fossil fuels. Students use mathematics to analyze graphical data and explore the Cartesian plane.

Fossil Fuels: Facing the Issues

Students explore energy by researching fuel usage on Earth. In this fossil fuel lesson, students define fossil fuels, the energy created by burning them, and the impact on the environment when using them. Students conduct pollution experiments by mining for cookies, using candles, and creating a mock oil spill.

Fossil Fuel Sources, Usage and Alternatives: What Are the Options?

Learners examine the relationship between energy and the environment. In groups, they participate in experiments to discover the law of thermodynamics and the differences between potential, kinetic and mechanical forms of energy. They examine the different types of fossil fuels and determine which alternatives would be best for the environment.

Fossil Fuel Sources, Usage and Alternatives: What are the Options?

Students identify the different sources of fossil fuels. In this environmental science lesson, students research about how these impact our environment. They explore renewable energy sources that could replace fossil fuels.

Fossil Fuels-Importance and Formation

Student is introduced to the concept of energy as a common factor among all things. They list three fossil fuels and describe how fossil fuels were formed. They then tell how much plant debris it took to form one foot of coal.

Fossil Fuels and the Carbon Cycle

Humans are quickly depleting Earth's fossil fuels and locating them is becoming increasingly difficult! Layered muffins are used for models as young geologists take core samples in order to determine the presence of oil. Consider first teaching about the carbon cycle and fossil fuels to give youngsters the background knowledge that will make this activity more meaningful. Be aware that significant preparation time is required as the teacher must bake the special muffins for the activity, but it will be well worth the time!

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