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Kindergarten

Social Studies

History

Geography

Civics and Government

Economics

Public Discourse, Decision Making, and Citizen Involvement (P3, P4)

1st

Social Studies

History

Geography

Civics and Government

Economics

Public Discourse, Decision Making, and Citizen Involvement (P3, P4)

2nd

Social Studies

History

Geography

Civics and Government

Economics

Public Discourse, Decision Making, and Citizen Involvement (P3, P4)

3rd

Social Studies

History

Geography

Civics and Government

Economics

Public Discourse, Decision Making, and Citizen Involvement (P3, P4)

4th

Social Studies

History

Geography

Civics and Government

Economics

Public Discourse, Decision Making, and Citizen Involvement (P3, P4)

5th

Social Studies

U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 1 - Beginnings to 1620

U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 2 - Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)

U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 3 - Revolution and the New Nation (1754-1800)

Public Discourse, Decision Making, and Citizen Involvement (P3, P4)

6th

Social Studies

Western Hemisphere Studies - History - The World in Temporal Terms: Historical Habits of Mind (Ways Thinking): Evaluate evidence, compare and contrast information, interpret the historical record, and develop sound historical arguments and perspectives on which informed decisions in contemporary life can be based.

Western Hemisphere Studies - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 1 - The Beginnings of Human Society: Beginnings to 4000 B.C.E./B.C.: Explain the basic features and differences between hunter-gatherer societies and pastoral nomads. Analyze and explain the geographic, environmental, biological, and cultural processes that influenced the rise of the earliest human communities, the migration and spread of people throughout the world, and the causes and consequences of the growth of agriculture.

Western Hemisphere Studies - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 2 - Early Civilizations and Cultures and the Emergence of Pastoral Peoples, 4000 to1000 B.C.E./B.C.: Describe and differentiate defining characteristics of early civilization and pastoral societies, where they emerged, and how they spread.

Western Hemisphere Studies - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 3 - Classical Traditions Major Empires, 1000 B.C.E./B.C. to 300 C.E./A.D.: Analyze the civilizations and empires that emerged during this era, noting their political, economic, and social systems, and their changing interactions with the environment. Analyze the innovations and social, political, and economic changes that occurred through the emergence of agrarian societies of Mesoamerica and Andean South America and the subsequent urbanization and trading economies that occurred in the region.

Western Hemisphere Studies - Geography - The World in Spatial Terms: Geographical Habits of Mind: Describe the relationships between people, places, and environments by using information that is in a geographic (spatial) context. Engage in mapping and analyzing the information to explain the patterns and relationships they reveal both between and among people, their cultures, and the natural environment. Identify and access information, evaluate it using criteria based on concepts and themes, and use geography in problem solving and decision making. Explain and use key conceptual devices (places and regions, spatial patterns and processes) that geographers use to organize information and inform their study of the world.

Western Hemisphere Studies - Geography - Places and Regions: Describe the cultural groups and diversities among people that are rooted in particular places and in human constructs called regions. Analyze the physical and human characteristics of places and regions.

Western Hemisphere Studies - Geography - Physical Systems: Describe the physical processes that shape the Earth's surface which, along with plants and animals, are the basis for both sustaining and modifying ecosystems. Identify and analyze the patterns and characteristics of the major ecosystems on Earth.

Western Hemisphere Studies - Geography - Human Systems: Explain that human activities may be seen on Earth's surface.

Western Hemisphere Studies - Geography - Environment and Society: Explain that the physical environment is modified by human activities, which are influenced by the ways in which human societies value and use Earth's natural resources, and by Earth's physical features and processes. Explain how human action modifies the physical environment and how physical systems affect human systems.

Western Hemisphere Studies - Geography - Global Issues Past and Present: Throughout the school year the students are introduced to topics that address global issues that integrate time and place. Included are capstone projects that entail the investigation of historical and contemporary global issues that have significance for the student and are clearly linked to the world outside the classroom. The topics and issues are developed as capstone projects within units and at the end of the course. Regular experiences with those topics and issues are necessary during each grade in order to build the background students will require to complete in-depth capstone projects. (H1.4.3, G1.2.6) (H1.4.3, G1.2.6)

Western Hemisphere Studies - Civics and Government - Purposes of Government: Analyze how people identify, organize, and accomplish the purposes of government.

Western Hemisphere Studies - Civics and Government - Structure Functions of Government: Describe the major activities of government, including making and enforcing laws, providing services and benefits to individuals and groups, assigning individual and collective responsibilities, generating revenue, and providing national security.

Western Hemisphere Studies - Civics and Government - Relationship of United States to Other Nations and World Affairs: Explain that nations interact with one another through trade, diplomacy, treaties and agreements, humanitarian aid, economic sanctions and incentives, and military force, and threat of force.

Western Hemisphere Studies - Economics - The Market Economy: Describe the market economy in terms of the relevance of limited resources, how individuals and institutions make and evaluate decisions, the role of incentives, how buyers and sellers interact to create markets, how markets allocate resources, and the economic role of government in a market economy.

Western Hemisphere Studies - Economics - The National Economy: Use economic concepts, terminology, and data to identify and describe how a national economy functions and to study the role of government as a provider of goods and services within a national economy.

Western Hemisphere Studies - Economics - International Economy: Analyze reasons for individuals and businesses to specialize and trade, why individuals and businesses trade across international borders, and the comparisons of the benefits and costs of specialization and the resulting trade for consumers, producers, and governments.

Public Discourse, Decision Making, and Citizen Involvement (P3, P4)

Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

7th

Social Studies

Eastern Hemisphere Studies - History - The World in Temporal Terms: Historical Habits of Mind: Evaluate evidence, compare and contrast information, interpret the historical record, and develop sound historical arguments and perspectives on which informed decisions in contemporary life can be based.

Eastern Hemisphere Studies - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 1 - Beginnings to 4000 B.C.E./B.C.: Explain the basic features and differences between hunter-gatherer societies and pastoral nomads. Analyze and explain the geographic, environmental, biological, and cultural processes that influenced the rise of the earliest human communities, the migration and spread of people throughout the world, and the causes and consequences of the growth of agriculture.

Eastern Hemisphere Studies - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 2 - Early Civilizations and Cultures and the Emergence of Pastoral Peoples, 4000 to 1000 B.C.E./B.C.: Describe and differentiate defining characteristics of early civilization and pastoral societies, where they emerged, and how they spread.

Eastern Hemisphere Studies - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 3 - Classical Traditions, World Religions, and Major Empires, 1000 B.C.E./B.C. to 300 C.E./A.D.: Analyze classical civilizations and empires and the emergence of major world religions and large-scale empires.

Eastern Hemisphere Studies - Geography - The World in Spatial Terms: Geographical Habits of Mind: Study the relationships between people, places, and environments by using information that is in a geographic (spatial) context. Engage in mapping and analyzing the information to explain the patterns and relationships they reveal both between and among people, their cultures, and the natural environment. Identify and access information, evaluate it using criteria based on concepts and themes, and use geography in problem solving and decision making. Explain and use key conceptual devices (places and regions, spatial patterns and processes) that geographers use to organize information and inform their study of the world.

Eastern Hemisphere Studies - Geography - Places and Regions: Describe the cultural groups and diversities among people that are rooted in particular places and in human constructs called regions. Analyze the physical and human characteristics of places and regions.

Eastern Hemisphere Studies - Geography - Physical Systems: Describe the physical processes that shape the Earth's surface which, along with plants and animals, are the basis for both sustaining and modifying ecosystems. Identify and analyze the patterns and characteristics of the major ecosystems on Earth.

Eastern Hemisphere Studies - Geography - Human Systems: Explain that human activities may be seen on Earth's surface. Human systems include the way people divide the land, decide where to live, develop communities that are part of the larger cultural mosaic, and engage in the cultural diffusion of ideas and products within and among groups.

Eastern Hemisphere Studies - Geography - Environment and Society: Explain that the physical environment is modified by human activities, which are influenced by the ways in which human societies value and use Earth's natural resources, and by Earth's physical features and processes. Explain how human action modifies the physical environment and how physical systems affect human systems.

Eastern Hemisphere Studies - Geography - Global Issues Past and Present: Throughout the school year the students are introduced to topics that address global issues that integrate time and place. Included are capstone projects that entail the investigation of historical and contemporary global issues that have significance for the student and are clearly linked to the world outside the classroom. The topics and issues are developed as capstone projects within units and at the end of the course. Regular experiences with those topics and issues are necessary during each grade in order to build the background students will require to complete in-depth capstone projects. (H1.4.3, G1.2.6)

Eastern Hemisphere Studies - Civics and Government - Purposes of Government: Analyze how people identify, organize, and accomplish the purposes of government.

Eastern Hemisphere Studies - Civics and Government - Structure and Functions of Government: Explain that governments are structured to serve the people. Describe the major activities of government, including making and enforcing laws, providing services and benefits to individuals and groups, assigning individual and collective responsibilities, generating revenue, and providing national security.

Eastern Hemisphere Studies - Civics and Government - Relationship of United States to Other Nations and World Affairs: Explain that nations interact with one another through trade, diplomacy, treaties and agreements, humanitarian aid, economic sanctions and incentives, and military force and threat of force.

Eastern Hemisphere Studies - Economics - The Market Economy: Describe the market economy in terms of the relevance of limited resources, how individuals and institutions make and evaluate decisions, the role of incentives, how buyers and sellers interact to create markets, how markets allocate resources, and the economic role of government in a market economy.

Eastern Hemisphere Studies - Economics - The National Economy: Use economic concepts, terminology, and data to identify and describe how a national economy functions they study the role of government as a provider of goods and services within a national economy.

Eastern Hemisphere Studies - Economics - International Economy: Analyze reasons for individuals and businesses to specialize and trade, why individuals and businesses trade across international borders, and the comparisons of the benefits and costs of specialization and the resulting trade for consumers, producers, and governments.

Public Discourse, Decision Making, and Citizen Involvement (P3, P4)

Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

8th

Social Studies

Integrated United States History - Foundations in United States History and Geography Eras 1-3 - Political and Intellectual Transformations

Integrated United States History - U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 3 - Revolution and the New Nation

Integrated United States History - U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 4 - Expansion and Reform (1792-1861)

Integrated United States History - U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 5 - Civil War and Reconstruction (1850-1877)

Integrated United States History - U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 6 - The Development of an Industrial, Urban, and Global United States (1870-1930)

Public Discourse, Decision Making, and Citizen Involvement (P3, P4)

Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

9th

Social Studies

World History and Geography - Foundations WHG 1-3: Beginning the High School World History and Geography Course/Credit

World History and Geography - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 4: Expanding and Intensified Hemispheric Interactions, 300 to 1500 C.E./A.D.

World History and Geography - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 5: The Emergence of the First Global Age, 15th to 18th Centuries

World History and Geography - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 6: An Age of Global Revolutions, 18th Century - 1914

World History and Geography - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 7: Global Crisis and Achievement, 1900-1945

World History and Geography - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 8: The Cold War and Its Aftermath: The 20th Century Since 1945

World History and Geography - Contemporary Global Issues: Evaluate the events, trends and forces that are increasing global interdependence and expanding global networks and evaluate the events, trends and forces that are attempting to maintain or expand autonomy of regional or local networks.

U.S. History and Geography - Foundations in U.S. History and Geography: Eras 1-5

U.S. History and Geography - U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 6: The Development of an Industrial, Urban, and Global United States (1870-1930)

U.S. History and Geography - U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 7: The Great Depression and World War II (1920-1945)

U.S. History and Geography - U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 8: Post-World War II United States (1945-1989)

U.S. History and Geography - U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 9: America in a New Global Age

Civics - Conceptual Foundations of Civic and Political Life

Civics - Origins and Foundations of Government of the United States of America

Civics - Structure and Functions of Government in the United States of America

Civics - The United States of America and World Affairs

Civics - Citizenship in the United States of America

Civics - Citizenship in Action

Economics - The Market Economy

Economics - The National Economy of the United States of America

Economics - The International Economy

Economics - Personal Finance

Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

10th

Social Studies

World History and Geography - Foundations WHG 1-3: Beginning the High School World History and Geography Course/Credit

World History and Geography - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 4: Expanding and Intensified Hemispheric Interactions, 300 to 1500 C.E./A.D.

World History and Geography - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 5: The Emergence of the First Global Age, 15th to 18th Centuries

World History and Geography - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 6: An Age of Global Revolutions, 18th Century - 1914

World History and Geography - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 7: Global Crisis and Achievement, 1900-1945

World History and Geography - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 8: The Cold War and Its Aftermath: The 20th Century Since 1945

World History and Geography - Contemporary Global Issues: Evaluate the events, trends and forces that are increasing global interdependence and expanding global networks and evaluate the events, trends and forces that are attempting to maintain or expand autonomy of regional or local networks.

U.S. History and Geography - Foundations in U.S. History and Geography: Eras 1-5

U.S. History and Geography - U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 6: The Development of an Industrial, Urban, and Global United States (1870-1930)

U.S. History and Geography - U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 7: The Great Depression and World War II (1920-1945)

U.S. History and Geography - U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 8: Post-World War II United States (1945-1989)

U.S. History and Geography - U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 9: America in a New Global Age

Civics - Conceptual Foundations of Civic and Political Life

Civics - Origins and Foundations of Government of the United States of America

Civics - Structure and Functions of Government in the United States of America

Civics - The United States of America and World Affairs

Civics - Citizenship in the United States of America

Civics - Citizenship in Action

Economics - The Market Economy

Economics - The National Economy of the United States of America

Economics - The International Economy

Economics - Personal Finance

Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

11th

Social Studies

World History and Geography - Foundations WHG 1-3: Beginning the High School World History and Geography Course/Credit

World History and Geography - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 4: Expanding and Intensified Hemispheric Interactions, 300 to 1500 C.E./A.D.

World History and Geography - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 5: The Emergence of the First Global Age, 15th to 18th Centuries

World History and Geography - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 6: An Age of Global Revolutions, 18th Century - 1914

World History and Geography - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 7: Global Crisis and Achievement, 1900-1945

World History and Geography - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 8: The Cold War and Its Aftermath: The 20th Century Since 1945

World History and Geography - Contemporary Global Issues: Evaluate the events, trends and forces that are increasing global interdependence and expanding global networks and evaluate the events, trends and forces that are attempting to maintain or expand autonomy of regional or local networks.

U.S. History and Geography - Foundations in U.S. History and Geography: Eras 1-5

U.S. History and Geography - U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 6: The Development of an Industrial, Urban, and Global United States (1870-1930)

U.S. History and Geography - U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 7: The Great Depression and World War II (1920-1945)

U.S. History and Geography - U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 8: Post-World War II United States (1945-1989)

U.S. History and Geography - U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 9: America in a New Global Age

Civics - Conceptual Foundations of Civic and Political Life

Civics - Origins and Foundations of Government of the United States of America

Civics - Structure and Functions of Government in the United States of America

Civics - The United States of America and World Affairs

Civics - Citizenship in the United States of America

Civics - Citizenship in Action

Economics - The Market Economy

Economics - The National Economy of the United States of America

Economics - The International Economy

Economics - Personal Finance

Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

12th

Social Studies

World History and Geography - Foundations WHG 1-3: Beginning the High School World History and Geography Course/Credit

World History and Geography - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 4: Expanding and Intensified Hemispheric Interactions, 300 to 1500 C.E./A.D.

World History and Geography - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 5: The Emergence of the First Global Age, 15th to 18th Centuries

World History and Geography - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 6: An Age of Global Revolutions, 18th Century - 1914

World History and Geography - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 7: Global Crisis and Achievement, 1900-1945

World History and Geography - World History and Geography (WHG) Era 8: The Cold War and Its Aftermath: The 20th Century Since 1945

World History and Geography - Contemporary Global Issues: Evaluate the events, trends and forces that are increasing global interdependence and expanding global networks and evaluate the events, trends and forces that are attempting to maintain or expand autonomy of regional or local networks.

U.S. History and Geography - Foundations in U.S. History and Geography: Eras 1-5

U.S. History and Geography - U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 6: The Development of an Industrial, Urban, and Global United States (1870-1930)

U.S. History and Geography - U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 7: The Great Depression and World War II (1920-1945)

U.S. History and Geography - U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 8: Post-World War II United States (1945-1989)

U.S. History and Geography - U.S. History and Geography (USHG) Era 9: America in a New Global Age

Civics - Conceptual Foundations of Civic and Political Life

Civics - Origins and Foundations of Government of the United States of America

Civics - Structure and Functions of Government in the United States of America

Civics - The United States of America and World Affairs

Civics - Citizenship in the United States of America

Civics - Citizenship in Action

Economics - The Market Economy

Economics - The National Economy of the United States of America

Economics - The International Economy

Economics - Personal Finance

Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

Search Standards