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New Hampshire

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Kindergarten

Arts Education

Dance: Identify and demonstrate movement elements and skills in performing dance.

Dance: Identify choreographic principles.

Dance: Recognize dance as a way to create and communicate meaning.

Dance: Apply and demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills in dance.

Dance: Recognize and demonstrate dance in various cultures and historical periods.

Dance: Make connections between dance and healthful living.

Dance: Make connections between dance and other disciplines.

Dance: Identify the range of careers in the field of dance.

Music: Sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Perform on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvise melodies, variations, and accompaniments.

Music: Compose and arrange music within specified guidelines.

Music: Read and notate music.

Music: Listen to, analyze, and describe music.

Music: Evaluate music and music performances.

Music: Understand relationships among music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts.

Music: Understand music in relation to history and culture.

Music: Identify the range of careers in the field of music.

Theatre: Students will create theatre through improvising, writing and refining scripts.

Theatre: Students will act by developing, improvising, communicating and sustaining characters.

Theatre: Students will design and produce the technical elements of theatre through artistic interpretation and execution.

Theatre: Students will direct by planning or interpreting works of theatre by organizing and conducting rehearsals.

Theatre: Students will research, evaluate and apply cultural and historical information to make artistic choices.

Theatre: Students will make curriculum connections among theatre, the arts, and other disciplines.

Theatre: Students will analyze, critique and construct meanings from works of theatre.

Theatre: Students will demonstrate an understanding of context by analyzing and comparing theatre in various cultures, historical periods and everyday life.

Theatre: Understand the range of careers in the field of theatre arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Visual Arts: Apply appropriate media, techniques, and processes.

Visual Arts: Identify and apply the elements of visual art and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Select and apply a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas.

Visual Arts: Analyze the visual arts in relation to history and culture.

Visual Arts: Analyze, interpret and evaluate their own and others' artwork.

Visual Arts: Students will make connections among the visual arts, other disciplines, and daily life.

Visual Arts: Understand the range of careers in the field of visual arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Health and PE

Health Education Curriculum Guidelines

Physical Education Curriculum Guidelines

Language Arts

Reading Standards for Literature

Reading Standards for Informational Text

Reading Standards: Foundational Skills

Writing Standards

Speaking and Listening Standards

Language Standards

Mathematics

Mathematical Practices

Counting and Cardinality

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Number and Operations in Base Ten

Measurement and Data

Geometry

Science

Science Process Skills: Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking Skills

Science Process Skills: Unifying Concepts of Science

Science Process Skills: Personal, Social, and Technological Perspectives

Science Process Skills: Science Skills for Information, Communication and Media Literacy

Earth Space Science: The Earth and Earth materials, as we know them today, have developed over long periods of time, through constant change processes.

Earth Space Science: The Earth is part of a solar system, made up of distinct parts, which have temporal and spatial interrelationships.

Earth Space Science: The origin and evolution of galaxies and the universe demonstrate fundamental principles of physical science across vast distances and time.

Earth Space Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Earth Space Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Life Science: All living organisms have identifiable structures and characteristics that allow for survival (organisms, populations, and species).

Life Science: Energy flows and matter recycles through an ecosystem.

Life Science: Groups of organisms show evidence of change over time (e.g. evolution, natural selection, structures, behaviors, and biochemistry).

Life Science: Humans are similar to other species in many ways, and yet are unique among Earth's life forms.

Life Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Life Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Physical Science: All living and nonliving things are composed of matter having characteristic properties that distinguish one substance from another (independent of size/amount of substance).

Physical Science: Energy is necessary for change to occur in matter. Energy can be stored, transferred and transformed, but cannot be destroyed.

Physical Science: The motion of an object is affected by force.

Physical Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Physical Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Social Studies

Civics and Governments: The goal of Civics is to educate students to understand the purpose, structure, and functions of government; the political process; the rule of law; and world affairs. Civics builds on a foundation of history, geography, and economics to teach students to become responsible, knowledgeable citizens, committed to participation in public affairs.

Economics: Economics is the study of the allocation and utilization of limited resources to meet society's unlimited needs and wants, including how goods and services are produced and distributed. Through economics, students examine the relationship between costs and benefits. They develop an understanding of basic economic concepts; economics in history; how economics affects and is affected by the individual; cycles in the economy; financial institutions and government; and international economics and trade. The goal of economic education is to prepare students to make effective decisions as consumers, producers, savers, investors, and as citizens.

Geography: The real crux of geography is understanding our physical Earth and human-environment interaction: knowing why people settle in an area, how they make their living and the resources they use, why they dress or speak the way they do, and what they do for entertainment. A geographically informed person can draw connections between locations of the Earth, recognize complex regional patterns, and appreciate the influence of place on human development.

New Hampshire and United States History: The study of New Hampshire and United States History is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the legacy of our republic, and to develop the empathy and analytical skills needed to participate intelligently and responsibly in our ongoing democratic experiment. Historical study exposes students to the enduring themes and issues of our past and emboldens them to courageously and compassionately meet the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in a state, a country and an interdependent world. Ultimately, the study of history will help students plan and implement responsible actions that support and enhance our collective values.

World History and Contemporary Issues: The study of World History and Contemporary Issues is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in an interdependent, increasingly connected world. Knowledge of past achievements and failures of different peoples and nations provides citizens of the 21st century with a broader context within which to address the many issues facing our nation and the world. World History fosters an appreciation of the roots of our nation's values and the values and perspectives of other peoples. It illustrates how humans have expressed themselves in different surroundings and at different times, revealing the many commonalties and differences shared by the world's peoples past and present.

Technology Education

Information and Communication Technologies Program

1st

Arts Education

Dance: Identify and demonstrate movement elements and skills in performing dance.

Dance: Identify choreographic principles.

Dance: Recognize dance as a way to create and communicate meaning.

Dance: Apply and demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills in dance.

Dance: Recognize and demonstrate dance in various cultures and historical periods.

Dance: Make connections between dance and healthful living.

Dance: Make connections between dance and other disciplines.

Dance: Identify the range of careers in the field of dance.

Music: Sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Perform on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvise melodies, variations, and accompaniments.

Music: Compose and arrange music within specified guidelines.

Music: Read and notate music.

Music: Listen to, analyze, and describe music.

Music: Evaluate music and music performances.

Music: Understand relationships among music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts.

Music: Understand music in relation to history and culture.

Music: Identify the range of careers in the field of music.

Theatre: Students will create theatre through improvising, writing and refining scripts.

Theatre: Students will act by developing, improvising, communicating and sustaining characters.

Theatre: Students will design and produce the technical elements of theatre through artistic interpretation and execution.

Theatre: Students will direct by planning or interpreting works of theatre by organizing and conducting rehearsals.

Theatre: Students will research, evaluate and apply cultural and historical information to make artistic choices.

Theatre: Students will make curriculum connections among theatre, the arts, and other disciplines.

Theatre: Students will analyze, critique and construct meanings from works of theatre.

Theatre: Students will demonstrate an understanding of context by analyzing and comparing theatre in various cultures, historical periods and everyday life.

Theatre: Understand the range of careers in the field of theatre arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Visual Arts: Apply appropriate media, techniques, and processes.

Visual Arts: Identify and apply the elements of visual art and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Select and apply a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas.

Visual Arts: Analyze the visual arts in relation to history and culture.

Visual Arts: Analyze, interpret and evaluate their own and others' artwork.

Visual Arts: Students will make connections among the visual arts, other disciplines, and daily life.

Visual Arts: Understand the range of careers in the field of visual arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Health and PE

Health Education Curriculum Guidelines

Physical Education Curriculum Guidelines

Language Arts

Reading Standards for Literature

Reading Standards for Informational Text

Reading Standards: Foundational Skills

Writing Standards

Speaking and Listening Standards

Language Standards

Mathematics

Mathematical Practices

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Number and Operations in Base Ten

Measurement and Data

Geometry

Science

Science Process Skills: Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking Skills

Science Process Skills: Unifying Concepts of Science

Science Process Skills: Personal, Social, and Technological Perspectives

Science Process Skills: Science Skills for Information, Communication and Media Literacy

Earth Space Science: The Earth and Earth materials, as we know them today, have developed over long periods of time, through constant change processes.

Earth Space Science: The Earth is part of a solar system, made up of distinct parts, which have temporal and spatial interrelationships.

Earth Space Science: The origin and evolution of galaxies and the universe demonstrate fundamental principles of physical science across vast distances and time.

Earth Space Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Earth Space Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Life Science: All living organisms have identifiable structures and characteristics that allow for survival (organisms, populations, and species).

Life Science: Energy flows and matter recycles through an ecosystem.

Life Science: Groups of organisms show evidence of change over time (e.g. evolution, natural selection, structures, behaviors, and biochemistry).

Life Science: Humans are similar to other species in many ways, and yet are unique among Earth's life forms.

Life Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Life Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Physical Science: All living and nonliving things are composed of matter having characteristic properties that distinguish one substance from another (independent of size/amount of substance).

Physical Science: Energy is necessary for change to occur in matter. Energy can be stored, transferred and transformed, but cannot be destroyed.

Physical Science: The motion of an object is affected by force.

Physical Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Physical Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Social Studies

Civics and Governments: The goal of Civics is to educate students to understand the purpose, structure, and functions of government; the political process; the rule of law; and world affairs. Civics builds on a foundation of history, geography, and economics to teach students to become responsible, knowledgeable citizens, committed to participation in public affairs.

Economics: Economics is the study of the allocation and utilization of limited resources to meet society's unlimited needs and wants, including how goods and services are produced and distributed. Through economics, students examine the relationship between costs and benefits. They develop an understanding of basic economic concepts; economics in history; how economics affects and is affected by the individual; cycles in the economy; financial institutions and government; and international economics and trade. The goal of economic education is to prepare students to make effective decisions as consumers, producers, savers, investors, and as citizens.

Geography: The real crux of geography is understanding our physical Earth and human-environment interaction: knowing why people settle in an area, how they make their living and the resources they use, why they dress or speak the way they do, and what they do for entertainment. A geographically informed person can draw connections between locations of the Earth, recognize complex regional patterns, and appreciate the influence of place on human development.

New Hampshire and United States History: The study of New Hampshire and United States History is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the legacy of our republic, and to develop the empathy and analytical skills needed to participate intelligently and responsibly in our ongoing democratic experiment. Historical study exposes students to the enduring themes and issues of our past and emboldens them to courageously and compassionately meet the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in a state, a country and an interdependent world. Ultimately, the study of history will help students plan and implement responsible actions that support and enhance our collective values.

World History and Contemporary Issues: The study of World History and Contemporary Issues is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in an interdependent, increasingly connected world. Knowledge of past achievements and failures of different peoples and nations provides citizens of the 21st century with a broader context within which to address the many issues facing our nation and the world. World History fosters an appreciation of the roots of our nation's values and the values and perspectives of other peoples. It illustrates how humans have expressed themselves in different surroundings and at different times, revealing the many commonalties and differences shared by the world's peoples past and present.

Technology Education

Information and Communication Technologies Program

2nd

Arts Education

Dance: Identify and demonstrate movement elements and skills in performing dance.

Dance: Identify choreographic principles.

Dance: Recognize dance as a way to create and communicate meaning.

Dance: Apply and demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills in dance.

Dance: Recognize and demonstrate dance in various cultures and historical periods.

Dance: Make connections between dance and healthful living.

Dance: Make connections between dance and other disciplines.

Dance: Identify the range of careers in the field of dance.

Music: Sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Perform on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvise melodies, variations, and accompaniments.

Music: Compose and arrange music within specified guidelines.

Music: Read and notate music.

Music: Listen to, analyze, and describe music.

Music: Evaluate music and music performances.

Music: Understand relationships among music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts.

Music: Understand music in relation to history and culture.

Music: Identify the range of careers in the field of music.

Theatre: Students will create theatre through improvising, writing and refining scripts.

Theatre: Students will act by developing, improvising, communicating and sustaining characters.

Theatre: Students will design and produce the technical elements of theatre through artistic interpretation and execution.

Theatre: Students will direct by planning or interpreting works of theatre by organizing and conducting rehearsals.

Theatre: Students will research, evaluate and apply cultural and historical information to make artistic choices.

Theatre: Students will make curriculum connections among theatre, the arts, and other disciplines.

Theatre: Students will analyze, critique and construct meanings from works of theatre.

Theatre: Students will demonstrate an understanding of context by analyzing and comparing theatre in various cultures, historical periods and everyday life.

Theatre: Understand the range of careers in the field of theatre arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Visual Arts: Apply appropriate media, techniques, and processes.

Visual Arts: Identify and apply the elements of visual art and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Select and apply a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas.

Visual Arts: Analyze the visual arts in relation to history and culture.

Visual Arts: Analyze, interpret and evaluate their own and others' artwork.

Visual Arts: Students will make connections among the visual arts, other disciplines, and daily life.

Visual Arts: Understand the range of careers in the field of visual arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Health and PE

Health Education Curriculum Guidelines

Physical Education Curriculum Guidelines

Language Arts

Reading Standards for Literature

Reading Standards for Informational Text

Reading Standards: Foundational Skills

Writing Standards

Speaking and Listening Standards

Language Standards

Mathematics

Mathematical Practices

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Number and Operations in Base Ten

Measurement and Data

Geometry

Science

Science Process Skills: Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking Skills

Science Process Skills: Unifying Concepts of Science

Science Process Skills: Personal, Social, and Technological Perspectives

Science Process Skills: Science Skills for Information, Communication and Media Literacy

Earth Space Science: The Earth and Earth materials, as we know them today, have developed over long periods of time, through constant change processes.

Earth Space Science: The Earth is part of a solar system, made up of distinct parts, which have temporal and spatial interrelationships.

Earth Space Science: The origin and evolution of galaxies and the universe demonstrate fundamental principles of physical science across vast distances and time.

Earth Space Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Earth Space Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Life Science: All living organisms have identifiable structures and characteristics that allow for survival (organisms, populations, and species).

Life Science: Energy flows and matter recycles through an ecosystem.

Life Science: Groups of organisms show evidence of change over time (e.g. evolution, natural selection, structures, behaviors, and biochemistry).

Life Science: Humans are similar to other species in many ways, and yet are unique among Earth's life forms.

Life Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Life Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Physical Science: All living and nonliving things are composed of matter having characteristic properties that distinguish one substance from another (independent of size/amount of substance).

Physical Science: Energy is necessary for change to occur in matter. Energy can be stored, transferred and transformed, but cannot be destroyed.

Physical Science: The motion of an object is affected by force.

Physical Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Physical Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Social Studies

Civics and Governments: The goal of Civics is to educate students to understand the purpose, structure, and functions of government; the political process; the rule of law; and world affairs. Civics builds on a foundation of history, geography, and economics to teach students to become responsible, knowledgeable citizens, committed to participation in public affairs.

Economics: Economics is the study of the allocation and utilization of limited resources to meet society's unlimited needs and wants, including how goods and services are produced and distributed. Through economics, students examine the relationship between costs and benefits. They develop an understanding of basic economic concepts; economics in history; how economics affects and is affected by the individual; cycles in the economy; financial institutions and government; and international economics and trade. The goal of economic education is to prepare students to make effective decisions as consumers, producers, savers, investors, and as citizens.

Geography: The real crux of geography is understanding our physical Earth and human-environment interaction: knowing why people settle in an area, how they make their living and the resources they use, why they dress or speak the way they do, and what they do for entertainment. A geographically informed person can draw connections between locations of the Earth, recognize complex regional patterns, and appreciate the influence of place on human development.

New Hampshire and United States History: The study of New Hampshire and United States History is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the legacy of our republic, and to develop the empathy and analytical skills needed to participate intelligently and responsibly in our ongoing democratic experiment. Historical study exposes students to the enduring themes and issues of our past and emboldens them to courageously and compassionately meet the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in a state, a country and an interdependent world. Ultimately, the study of history will help students plan and implement responsible actions that support and enhance our collective values.

World History and Contemporary Issues: The study of World History and Contemporary Issues is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in an interdependent, increasingly connected world. Knowledge of past achievements and failures of different peoples and nations provides citizens of the 21st century with a broader context within which to address the many issues facing our nation and the world. World History fosters an appreciation of the roots of our nation's values and the values and perspectives of other peoples. It illustrates how humans have expressed themselves in different surroundings and at different times, revealing the many commonalties and differences shared by the world's peoples past and present.

Technology Education

Information and Communication Technologies Program

3rd

Arts Education

Dance: Identify and demonstrate movement elements and skills in performing dance.

Dance: Identify choreographic principles.

Dance: Recognize dance as a way to create and communicate meaning.

Dance: Apply and demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills in dance.

Dance: Recognize and demonstrate dance in various cultures and historical periods.

Dance: Make connections between dance and healthful living.

Dance: Make connections between dance and other disciplines.

Dance: Identify the range of careers in the field of dance.

Music: Sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Perform on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvise melodies, variations, and accompaniments.

Music: Compose and arrange music within specified guidelines.

Music: Read and notate music.

Music: Listen to, analyze, and describe music.

Music: Evaluate music and music performances.

Music: Understand relationships among music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts.

Music: Understand music in relation to history and culture.

Music: Identify the range of careers in the field of music.

Theatre: Students will create theatre through improvising, writing and refining scripts.

Theatre: Students will act by developing, improvising, communicating and sustaining characters.

Theatre: Students will design and produce the technical elements of theatre through artistic interpretation and execution.

Theatre: Students will direct by planning or interpreting works of theatre by organizing and conducting rehearsals.

Theatre: Students will research, evaluate and apply cultural and historical information to make artistic choices.

Theatre: Students will make curriculum connections among theatre, the arts, and other disciplines.

Theatre: Students will analyze, critique and construct meanings from works of theatre.

Theatre: Students will demonstrate an understanding of context by analyzing and comparing theatre in various cultures, historical periods and everyday life.

Theatre: Understand the range of careers in the field of theatre arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Visual Arts: Apply appropriate media, techniques, and processes.

Visual Arts: Identify and apply the elements of visual art and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Select and apply a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas.

Visual Arts: Analyze the visual arts in relation to history and culture.

Visual Arts: Analyze, interpret and evaluate their own and others' artwork.

Visual Arts: Students will make connections among the visual arts, other disciplines, and daily life.

Visual Arts: Understand the range of careers in the field of visual arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Health and PE

Health Education Curriculum Guidelines

Physical Education Curriculum Guidelines

Language Arts

Reading Standards for Literature

Reading Standards for Informational Text

Reading Standards: Foundational Skills

Writing Standards

Speaking and Listening Standards

Language Standards

Mathematics

Mathematical Practices

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Number and Operations in Base Ten

Number and Operations--Fractions

Measurement and Data

Geometry

Science

Science Process Skills: Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking Skills

Science Process Skills: Unifying Concepts of Science

Science Process Skills: Personal, Social, and Technological Perspectives

Science Process Skills: Science Skills for Information, Communication and Media Literacy

Earth Space Science: The Earth and Earth materials, as we know them today, have developed over long periods of time, through constant change processes.

Earth Space Science: The Earth is part of a solar system, made up of distinct parts, which have temporal and spatial interrelationships.

Earth Space Science: The origin and evolution of galaxies and the universe demonstrate fundamental principles of physical science across vast distances and time.

Earth Space Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Earth Space Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Life Science: All living organisms have identifiable structures and characteristics that allow for survival (organisms, populations, and species).

Life Science: Energy flows and matter recycles through an ecosystem.

Life Science: Groups of organisms show evidence of change over time (e.g. evolution, natural selection, structures, behaviors, and biochemistry).

Life Science: Humans are similar to other species in many ways, and yet are unique among Earth's life forms.

Life Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Life Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Physical Science: All living and nonliving things are composed of matter having characteristic properties that distinguish one substance from another (independent of size/amount of substance).

Physical Science: Energy is necessary for change to occur in matter. Energy can be stored, transferred and transformed, but cannot be destroyed.

Physical Science: The motion of an object is affected by force.

Physical Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Physical Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Social Studies

Civics and Governments: The goal of Civics is to educate students to understand the purpose, structure, and functions of government; the political process; the rule of law; and world affairs. Civics builds on a foundation of history, geography, and economics to teach students to become responsible, knowledgeable citizens, committed to participation in public affairs.

Economics: Economics is the study of the allocation and utilization of limited resources to meet society's unlimited needs and wants, including how goods and services are produced and distributed. Through economics, students examine the relationship between costs and benefits. They develop an understanding of basic economic concepts; economics in history; how economics affects and is affected by the individual; cycles in the economy; financial institutions and government; and international economics and trade. The goal of economic education is to prepare students to make effective decisions as consumers, producers, savers, investors, and as citizens.

Geography: The real crux of geography is understanding our physical Earth and human-environment interaction: knowing why people settle in an area, how they make their living and the resources they use, why they dress or speak the way they do, and what they do for entertainment. A geographically informed person can draw connections between locations of the Earth, recognize complex regional patterns, and appreciate the influence of place on human development.

New Hampshire and United States History: The study of New Hampshire and United States History is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the legacy of our republic, and to develop the empathy and analytical skills needed to participate intelligently and responsibly in our ongoing democratic experiment. Historical study exposes students to the enduring themes and issues of our past and emboldens them to courageously and compassionately meet the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in a state, a country and an interdependent world. Ultimately, the study of history will help students plan and implement responsible actions that support and enhance our collective values.

World History and Contemporary Issues: The study of World History and Contemporary Issues is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in an interdependent, increasingly connected world. Knowledge of past achievements and failures of different peoples and nations provides citizens of the 21st century with a broader context within which to address the many issues facing our nation and the world. World History fosters an appreciation of the roots of our nation's values and the values and perspectives of other peoples. It illustrates how humans have expressed themselves in different surroundings and at different times, revealing the many commonalties and differences shared by the world's peoples past and present.

Technology Education

Information and Communication Technologies Program

4th

Arts Education

Dance: Identify and demonstrate movement elements and skills in performing dance.

Dance: Identify choreographic principles.

Dance: Recognize dance as a way to create and communicate meaning.

Dance: Apply and demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills in dance.

Dance: Recognize and demonstrate dance in various cultures and historical periods.

Dance: Make connections between dance and healthful living.

Dance: Make connections between dance and other disciplines.

Dance: Identify the range of careers in the field of dance.

Music: Sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Perform on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvise melodies, variations, and accompaniments.

Music: Compose and arrange music within specified guidelines.

Music: Read and notate music.

Music: Listen to, analyze, and describe music.

Music: Evaluate music and music performances.

Music: Understand relationships among music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts.

Music: Understand music in relation to history and culture.

Music: Identify the range of careers in the field of music.

Theatre: Students will create theatre through improvising, writing and refining scripts.

Theatre: Students will act by developing, improvising, communicating and sustaining characters.

Theatre: Students will design and produce the technical elements of theatre through artistic interpretation and execution.

Theatre: Students will direct by planning or interpreting works of theatre by organizing and conducting rehearsals.

Theatre: Students will research, evaluate and apply cultural and historical information to make artistic choices.

Theatre: Students will make curriculum connections among theatre, the arts, and other disciplines.

Theatre: Students will analyze, critique and construct meanings from works of theatre.

Theatre: Students will demonstrate an understanding of context by analyzing and comparing theatre in various cultures, historical periods and everyday life.

Theatre: Understand the range of careers in the field of theatre arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Visual Arts: Apply appropriate media, techniques, and processes.

Visual Arts: Identify and apply the elements of visual art and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Select and apply a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas.

Visual Arts: Analyze the visual arts in relation to history and culture.

Visual Arts: Analyze, interpret and evaluate their own and others' artwork.

Visual Arts: Students will make connections among the visual arts, other disciplines, and daily life.

Visual Arts: Understand the range of careers in the field of visual arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Health and PE

Health Education Curriculum Guidelines

Physical Education Curriculum Guidelines

Language Arts

Reading Standards for Literature

Reading Standards for Informational Text

Reading Standards: Foundational Skills

Writing Standards

Speaking and Listening Standards

Language Standards

Mathematics

Mathematical Practices

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Number and Operations in Base Ten

Number and Operations--Fractions

Measurement and Data

Geometry

Science

Science Process Skills: Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking Skills

Science Process Skills: Unifying Concepts of Science

Science Process Skills: Personal, Social, and Technological Perspectives

Science Process Skills: Science Skills for Information, Communication and Media Literacy

Earth Space Science: The Earth and Earth materials, as we know them today, have developed over long periods of time, through constant change processes.

Earth Space Science: The Earth is part of a solar system, made up of distinct parts, which have temporal and spatial interrelationships.

Earth Space Science: The origin and evolution of galaxies and the universe demonstrate fundamental principles of physical science across vast distances and time.

Earth Space Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Earth Space Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Life Science: All living organisms have identifiable structures and characteristics that allow for survival (organisms, populations, and species).

Life Science: Energy flows and matter recycles through an ecosystem.

Life Science: Groups of organisms show evidence of change over time (e.g. evolution, natural selection, structures, behaviors, and biochemistry).

Life Science: Humans are similar to other species in many ways, and yet are unique among Earth's life forms.

Life Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Life Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Physical Science: All living and nonliving things are composed of matter having characteristic properties that distinguish one substance from another (independent of size/amount of substance).

Physical Science: Energy is necessary for change to occur in matter. Energy can be stored, transferred and transformed, but cannot be destroyed.

Physical Science: The motion of an object is affected by force.

Physical Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Physical Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Social Studies

Civics and Governments: The goal of Civics is to educate students to understand the purpose, structure, and functions of government; the political process; the rule of law; and world affairs. Civics builds on a foundation of history, geography, and economics to teach students to become responsible, knowledgeable citizens, committed to participation in public affairs.

Economics: Economics is the study of the allocation and utilization of limited resources to meet society's unlimited needs and wants, including how goods and services are produced and distributed. Through economics, students examine the relationship between costs and benefits. They develop an understanding of basic economic concepts; economics in history; how economics affects and is affected by the individual; cycles in the economy; financial institutions and government; and international economics and trade. The goal of economic education is to prepare students to make effective decisions as consumers, producers, savers, investors, and as citizens.

Geography: The real crux of geography is understanding our physical Earth and human-environment interaction: knowing why people settle in an area, how they make their living and the resources they use, why they dress or speak the way they do, and what they do for entertainment. A geographically informed person can draw connections between locations of the Earth, recognize complex regional patterns, and appreciate the influence of place on human development.

New Hampshire and United States History: The study of New Hampshire and United States History is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the legacy of our republic, and to develop the empathy and analytical skills needed to participate intelligently and responsibly in our ongoing democratic experiment. Historical study exposes students to the enduring themes and issues of our past and emboldens them to courageously and compassionately meet the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in a state, a country and an interdependent world. Ultimately, the study of history will help students plan and implement responsible actions that support and enhance our collective values.

World History and Contemporary Issues: The study of World History and Contemporary Issues is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in an interdependent, increasingly connected world. Knowledge of past achievements and failures of different peoples and nations provides citizens of the 21st century with a broader context within which to address the many issues facing our nation and the world. World History fosters an appreciation of the roots of our nation's values and the values and perspectives of other peoples. It illustrates how humans have expressed themselves in different surroundings and at different times, revealing the many commonalties and differences shared by the world's peoples past and present.

Technology Education

Information and Communication Technologies Program

5th

Arts Education

Dance: Identify and demonstrate movement elements and skills in performing dance.

Dance: Identify choreographic principles.

Dance: Recognize dance as a way to create and communicate meaning.

Dance: Apply and demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills in dance.

Dance: Recognize and demonstrate dance in various cultures and historical periods.

Dance: Make connections between dance and healthful living.

Dance: Make connections between dance and other disciplines.

Dance: Identify the range of careers in the field of dance.

Music: Sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Perform on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvise melodies, variations, and accompaniments.

Music: Compose and arrange music within specified guidelines.

Music: Read and notate music.

Music: Listen to, analyze, and describe music.

Music: Evaluate music and music performances.

Music: Understand relationships among music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts.

Music: Understand music in relation to history and culture.

Music: Identify the range of careers in the field of music.

Theatre: Students will create theatre through improvising, writing and refining scripts.

Theatre: Students will act by developing, improvising, communicating and sustaining characters.

Theatre: Students will design and produce the technical elements of theatre through artistic interpretation and execution.

Theatre: Students will direct by planning or interpreting works of theatre by organizing and conducting rehearsals.

Theatre: Students will research, evaluate and apply cultural and historical information to make artistic choices.

Theatre: Students will make curriculum connections among theatre, the arts, and other disciplines.

Theatre: Students will analyze, critique and construct meanings from works of theatre.

Theatre: Students will demonstrate an understanding of context by analyzing and comparing theatre in various cultures, historical periods and everyday life.

Theatre: Understand the range of careers in the field of theatre arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Visual Arts: Apply appropriate media, techniques, and processes.

Visual Arts: Identify and apply the elements of visual art and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Select and apply a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas.

Visual Arts: Analyze the visual arts in relation to history and culture.

Visual Arts: Analyze, interpret and evaluate their own and others' artwork.

Visual Arts: Students will make connections among the visual arts, other disciplines, and daily life.

Visual Arts: Understand the range of careers in the field of visual arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Health and PE

Health Education Curriculum Guidelines

Physical Education Curriculum Guidelines

Language Arts

Reading Standards for Literature

Reading Standards for Informational Text

Reading Standards: Foundational Skills

Writing Standards

Speaking and Listening Standards

Language Standards

Mathematics

Mathematical Practices

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Number and Operations in Base Ten

Number and Operations--Fractions

Measurement and Data

Geometry

Science

Science Process Skills: Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking Skills

Science Process Skills: Unifying Concepts of Science

Science Process Skills: Personal, Social, and Technological Perspectives

Science Process Skills: Science Skills for Information, Communication and Media Literacy

Earth Space Science: The Earth and Earth materials, as we know them today, have developed over long periods of time, through constant change processes.

Earth Space Science: The Earth is part of a solar system, made up of distinct parts, which have temporal and spatial interrelationships.

Earth Space Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Earth Space Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Life Science: All living organisms have identifiable structures and characteristics that allow for survival (organisms, populations, and species).

Life Science: Energy flows and matter recycles through an ecosystem.

Life Science: Groups of organisms show evidence of change over time (e.g. evolution, natural selection, structures, behaviors, and biochemistry).

Life Science: Humans are similar to other species in many ways, and yet are unique among Earth's life forms.

Life Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Life Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Physical Science: All living and nonliving things are composed of matter having characteristic properties that distinguish one substance from another (independent of size/amount of substance).

Physical Science: Energy is necessary for change to occur in matter. Energy can be stored, transferred and transformed, but cannot be destroyed.

Physical Science: The motion of an object is affected by force.

Physical Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Physical Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Social Studies

Civics and Governments: The goal of Civics is to educate students to understand the purpose, structure, and functions of government; the political process; the rule of law; and world affairs. Civics builds on a foundation of history, geography, and economics to teach students to become responsible, knowledgeable citizens, committed to participation in public affairs.

Economics: Economics is the study of the allocation and utilization of limited resources to meet society's unlimited needs and wants, including how goods and services are produced and distributed. Through economics, students examine the relationship between costs and benefits. They develop an understanding of basic economic concepts; economics in history; how economics affects and is affected by the individual; cycles in the economy; financial institutions and government; and international economics and trade. The goal of economic education is to prepare students to make effective decisions as consumers, producers, savers, investors, and as citizens.

Geography: The real crux of geography is understanding our physical Earth and human-environment interaction: knowing why people settle in an area, how they make their living and the resources they use, why they dress or speak the way they do, and what they do for entertainment. A geographically informed person can draw connections between locations of the Earth, recognize complex regional patterns, and appreciate the influence of place on human development.

New Hampshire and United States History: The study of New Hampshire and United States History is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the legacy of our republic, and to develop the empathy and analytical skills needed to participate intelligently and responsibly in our ongoing democratic experiment. Historical study exposes students to the enduring themes and issues of our past and emboldens them to courageously and compassionately meet the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in a state, a country and an interdependent world. Ultimately, the study of history will help students plan and implement responsible actions that support and enhance our collective values.

World History and Contemporary Issues: The study of World History and Contemporary Issues is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in an interdependent, increasingly connected world. Knowledge of past achievements and failures of different peoples and nations provides citizens of the 21st century with a broader context within which to address the many issues facing our nation and the world. World History fosters an appreciation of the roots of our nation's values and the values and perspectives of other peoples. It illustrates how humans have expressed themselves in different surroundings and at different times, revealing the many commonalties and differences shared by the world's peoples past and present.

Technology Education

Information and Communication Technologies Program

6th

Arts Education

Dance: Identify and demonstrate movement elements and skills in performing dance.

Dance: Identify choreographic principles.

Dance: Recognize dance as a way to create and communicate meaning.

Dance: Apply and demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills in dance.

Dance: Recognize and demonstrate dance in various cultures and historical periods.

Dance: Make connections between dance and healthful living.

Dance: Make connections between dance and other disciplines.

Dance: Identify the range of careers in the field of dance.

Music: Sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Perform on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvise melodies, variations, and accompaniments.

Music: Compose and arrange music within specified guidelines.

Music: Read and notate music.

Music: Listen to, analyze, and describe music.

Music: Evaluate music and music performances.

Music: Understand relationships among music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts.

Music: Understand music in relation to history and culture.

Music: Identify the range of careers in the field of music.

Theatre: Students will create theatre through improvising, writing and refining scripts.

Theatre: Students will act by developing, improvising, communicating and sustaining characters.

Theatre: Students will design and produce the technical elements of theatre through artistic interpretation and execution.

Theatre: Students will direct by planning or interpreting works of theatre by organizing and conducting rehearsals.

Theatre: Students will research, evaluate and apply cultural and historical information to make artistic choices.

Theatre: Students will make curriculum connections among theatre, the arts, and other disciplines.

Theatre: Students will analyze, critique and construct meanings from works of theatre.

Theatre: Students will demonstrate an understanding of context by analyzing and comparing theatre in various cultures, historical periods and everyday life.

Theatre: Understand the range of careers in the field of theatre arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Visual Arts: Apply appropriate media, techniques, and processes.

Visual Arts: Identify and apply the elements of visual art and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Select and apply a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas.

Visual Arts: Analyze the visual arts in relation to history and culture.

Visual Arts: Analyze, interpret and evaluate their own and others' artwork.

Visual Arts: Students will make connections among the visual arts, other disciplines, and daily life.

Visual Arts: Understand the range of careers in the field of visual arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Health and PE

Health Education Curriculum Guidelines

Physical Education Curriculum Guidelines

Language Arts

Reading Standards for Literature

Reading Standards for Informational Text

Writing Standards

Speaking and Listening Standards

Language Standards

Mathematics

Mathematical Practices

Ratios and Proportional Relationships

The Number System

Expressions and Equations

Geometry

Statistics and Probability

Science

Science Process Skills: Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking Skills

Science Process Skills: Unifying Concepts of Science

Science Process Skills: Personal, Social, and Technological Perspectives

Science Process Skills: Science Skills for Information, Communication and Media Literacy

Earth Space Science: The Earth and Earth materials, as we know them today, have developed over long periods of time, through constant change processes.

Earth Space Science: The Earth is part of a solar system, made up of distinct parts, which have temporal and spatial interrelationships.

Earth Space Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Earth Space Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Life Science: All living organisms have identifiable structures and characteristics that allow for survival (organisms, populations, and species).

Life Science: Energy flows and matter recycles through an ecosystem.

Life Science: Groups of organisms show evidence of change over time (e.g. evolution, natural selection, structures, behaviors, and biochemistry).

Life Science: Humans are similar to other species in many ways, and yet are unique among Earth's life forms.

Life Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Life Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Physical Science: All living and nonliving things are composed of matter having characteristic properties that distinguish one substance from another (independent of size/amount of substance).

Physical Science: Energy is necessary for change to occur in matter. Energy can be stored, transferred and transformed, but cannot be destroyed.

Physical Science: The motion of an object is affected by force.

Physical Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Physical Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Writing Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Social Studies

Civics and Governments: The goal of Civics is to educate students to understand the purpose, structure, and functions of government; the political process; the rule of law; and world affairs. Civics builds on a foundation of history, geography, and economics to teach students to become responsible, knowledgeable citizens, committed to participation in public affairs.

Economics: Economics is the study of the allocation and utilization of limited resources to meet society's unlimited needs and wants, including how goods and services are produced and distributed. Through economics, students examine the relationship between costs and benefits. They develop an understanding of basic economic concepts; economics in history; how economics affects and is affected by the individual; cycles in the economy; financial institutions and government; and international economics and trade. The goal of economic education is to prepare students to make effective decisions as consumers, producers, savers, investors, and as citizens.

Geography: The real crux of geography is understanding our physical Earth and human-environment interaction: knowing why people settle in an area, how they make their living and the resources they use, why they dress or speak the way they do, and what they do for entertainment. A geographically informed person can draw connections between locations of the Earth, recognize complex regional patterns, and appreciate the influence of place on human development.

New Hampshire and United States History: The study of New Hampshire and United States History is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the legacy of our republic, and to develop the empathy and analytical skills needed to participate intelligently and responsibly in our ongoing democratic experiment. Historical study exposes students to the enduring themes and issues of our past and emboldens them to courageously and compassionately meet the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in a state, a country and an interdependent world. Ultimately, the study of history will help students plan and implement responsible actions that support and enhance our collective values.

World History and Contemporary Issues: The study of World History and Contemporary Issues is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in an interdependent, increasingly connected world. Knowledge of past achievements and failures of different peoples and nations provides citizens of the 21st century with a broader context within which to address the many issues facing our nation and the world. World History fosters an appreciation of the roots of our nation's values and the values and perspectives of other peoples. It illustrates how humans have expressed themselves in different surroundings and at different times, revealing the many commonalties and differences shared by the world's peoples past and present.

Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

Technology Education

Information and Communication Technologies Program

7th

Arts Education

Dance: Identify and demonstrate movement elements and skills in performing dance.

Dance: Identify choreographic principles.

Dance: Recognize dance as a way to create and communicate meaning.

Dance: Apply and demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills in dance.

Dance: Recognize and demonstrate dance in various cultures and historical periods.

Dance: Make connections between dance and healthful living.

Dance: Make connections between dance and other disciplines.

Dance: Identify the range of careers in the field of dance.

Music: Sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Perform on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvise melodies, variations, and accompaniments.

Music: Compose and arrange music within specified guidelines.

Music: Read and notate music.

Music: Listen to, analyze, and describe music.

Music: Evaluate music and music performances.

Music: Understand relationships among music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts.

Music: Understand music in relation to history and culture.

Music: Identify the range of careers in the field of music.

Theatre: Students will create theatre through improvising, writing and refining scripts.

Theatre: Students will act by developing, improvising, communicating and sustaining characters.

Theatre: Students will design and produce the technical elements of theatre through artistic interpretation and execution.

Theatre: Students will direct by planning or interpreting works of theatre by organizing and conducting rehearsals.

Theatre: Students will research, evaluate and apply cultural and historical information to make artistic choices.

Theatre: Students will make curriculum connections among theatre, the arts, and other disciplines.

Theatre: Students will analyze, critique and construct meanings from works of theatre.

Theatre: Students will demonstrate an understanding of context by analyzing and comparing theatre in various cultures, historical periods and everyday life.

Theatre: Understand the range of careers in the field of theatre arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Visual Arts: Apply appropriate media, techniques, and processes.

Visual Arts: Identify and apply the elements of visual art and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Select and apply a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas.

Visual Arts: Analyze the visual arts in relation to history and culture.

Visual Arts: Analyze, interpret and evaluate their own and others' artwork.

Visual Arts: Students will make connections among the visual arts, other disciplines, and daily life.

Visual Arts: Understand the range of careers in the field of visual arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Health and PE

Health Education Curriculum Guidelines

Physical Education Curriculum Guidelines

Language Arts

Reading Standards for Literature

Reading Standards for Informational Text

Writing Standards

Speaking and Listening Standards

Language Standards

Mathematics

Mathematical Practices

Ratios and Proportional Relationships

The Number System

Expressions and Equations

Geometry

Statistics and Probability

Science

Science Process Skills: Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking Skills

Science Process Skills: Unifying Concepts of Science

Science Process Skills: Personal, Social, and Technological Perspectives

Science Process Skills: Science Skills for Information, Communication and Media Literacy

Earth Space Science: The Earth and Earth materials, as we know them today, have developed over long periods of time, through constant change processes.

Earth Space Science: The Earth is part of a solar system, made up of distinct parts, which have temporal and spatial interrelationships.

Earth Space Science: The origin and evolution of galaxies and the universe demonstrate fundamental principles of physical science across vast distances and time.

Earth Space Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Earth Space Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Life Science: All living organisms have identifiable structures and characteristics that allow for survival (organisms, populations, and species).

Life Science: Energy flows and matter recycles through an ecosystem.

Life Science: Groups of organisms show evidence of change over time (e.g. evolution, natural selection, structures, behaviors, and biochemistry).

Life Science: Humans are similar to other species in many ways, and yet are unique among Earth's life forms.

Life Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Life Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Physical Science: All living and nonliving things are composed of matter having characteristic properties that distinguish one substance from another (independent of size/amount of substance).

Physical Science: Energy is necessary for change to occur in matter. Energy can be stored, transferred and transformed, but cannot be destroyed.

Physical Science: The motion of an object is affected by force.

Physical Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Physical Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Writing Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Social Studies

Civics and Governments: The goal of Civics is to educate students to understand the purpose, structure, and functions of government; the political process; the rule of law; and world affairs. Civics builds on a foundation of history, geography, and economics to teach students to become responsible, knowledgeable citizens, committed to participation in public affairs.

Economics: Economics is the study of the allocation and utilization of limited resources to meet society's unlimited needs and wants, including how goods and services are produced and distributed. Through economics, students examine the relationship between costs and benefits. They develop an understanding of basic economic concepts; economics in history; how economics affects and is affected by the individual; cycles in the economy; financial institutions and government; and international economics and trade. The goal of economic education is to prepare students to make effective decisions as consumers, producers, savers, investors, and as citizens.

Geography: The real crux of geography is understanding our physical Earth and human-environment interaction: knowing why people settle in an area, how they make their living and the resources they use, why they dress or speak the way they do, and what they do for entertainment. A geographically informed person can draw connections between locations of the Earth, recognize complex regional patterns, and appreciate the influence of place on human development.

New Hampshire and United States History: The study of New Hampshire and United States History is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the legacy of our republic, and to develop the empathy and analytical skills needed to participate intelligently and responsibly in our ongoing democratic experiment. Historical study exposes students to the enduring themes and issues of our past and emboldens them to courageously and compassionately meet the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in a state, a country and an interdependent world. Ultimately, the study of history will help students plan and implement responsible actions that support and enhance our collective values.

World History and Contemporary Issues: The study of World History and Contemporary Issues is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in an interdependent, increasingly connected world. Knowledge of past achievements and failures of different peoples and nations provides citizens of the 21st century with a broader context within which to address the many issues facing our nation and the world. World History fosters an appreciation of the roots of our nation's values and the values and perspectives of other peoples. It illustrates how humans have expressed themselves in different surroundings and at different times, revealing the many commonalties and differences shared by the world's peoples past and present.

Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

Technology Education

Information and Communication Technologies Program

8th

Arts Education

Dance: Identify and demonstrate movement elements and skills in performing dance.

Dance: Identify choreographic principles.

Dance: Recognize dance as a way to create and communicate meaning.

Dance: Apply and demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills in dance.

Dance: Recognize and demonstrate dance in various cultures and historical periods.

Dance: Make connections between dance and healthful living.

Dance: Make connections between dance and other disciplines.

Dance: Identify the range of careers in the field of dance.

Music: Sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Perform on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvise melodies, variations, and accompaniments.

Music: Compose and arrange music within specified guidelines.

Music: Read and notate music.

Music: Listen to, analyze, and describe music.

Music: Evaluate music and music performances.

Music: Understand relationships among music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts.

Music: Understand music in relation to history and culture.

Music: Identify the range of careers in the field of music.

Theatre: Students will create theatre through improvising, writing and refining scripts.

Theatre: Students will act by developing, improvising, communicating and sustaining characters.

Theatre: Students will design and produce the technical elements of theatre through artistic interpretation and execution.

Theatre: Students will direct by planning or interpreting works of theatre by organizing and conducting rehearsals.

Theatre: Students will research, evaluate and apply cultural and historical information to make artistic choices.

Theatre: Students will make curriculum connections among theatre, the arts, and other disciplines.

Theatre: Students will analyze, critique and construct meanings from works of theatre.

Theatre: Students will demonstrate an understanding of context by analyzing and comparing theatre in various cultures, historical periods and everyday life.

Theatre: Understand the range of careers in the field of theatre arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Visual Arts: Apply appropriate media, techniques, and processes.

Visual Arts: Identify and apply the elements of visual art and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Select and apply a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas.

Visual Arts: Analyze the visual arts in relation to history and culture.

Visual Arts: Analyze, interpret and evaluate their own and others' artwork.

Visual Arts: Students will make connections among the visual arts, other disciplines, and daily life.

Visual Arts: Understand the range of careers in the field of visual arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Health and PE

Health Education Curriculum Guidelines

Physical Education Curriculum Guidelines

Language Arts

Reading Standards for Literature

Reading Standards for Informational Text

Writing Standards

Speaking and Listening Standards

Language Standards

Mathematics

Mathematical Practices

The Number System

Expressions and Equations

Functions

Geometry

Statistics and Probability

Science

Science Process Skills: Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking Skills

Science Process Skills: Unifying Concepts of Science

Science Process Skills: Personal, Social, and Technological Perspectives

Science Process Skills: Science Skills for Information, Communication and Media Literacy

Earth Space Science: The Earth and Earth materials, as we know them today, have developed over long periods of time, through constant change processes.

Earth Space Science: The Earth is part of a solar system, made up of distinct parts, which have temporal and spatial interrelationships.

Earth Space Science: The origin and evolution of galaxies and the universe demonstrate fundamental principles of physical science across vast distances and time.

Earth Space Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Earth Space Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Life Science: All living organisms have identifiable structures and characteristics that allow for survival (organisms, populations, and species).

Life Science: Energy flows and matter recycles through an ecosystem.

Life Science: Groups of organisms show evidence of change over time (e.g. evolution, natural selection, structures, behaviors, and biochemistry).

Life Science: Humans are similar to other species in many ways, and yet are unique among Earth's life forms.

Life Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Life Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Physical Science: All living and nonliving things are composed of matter having characteristic properties that distinguish one substance from another (independent of size/amount of substance).

Physical Science: Energy is necessary for change to occur in matter. Energy can be stored, transferred and transformed, but cannot be destroyed.

Physical Science: The motion of an object is affected by force.

Physical Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Physical Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Writing Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Social Studies

Civics and Governments: The goal of Civics is to educate students to understand the purpose, structure, and functions of government; the political process; the rule of law; and world affairs. Civics builds on a foundation of history, geography, and economics to teach students to become responsible, knowledgeable citizens, committed to participation in public affairs.

Economics: Economics is the study of the allocation and utilization of limited resources to meet society's unlimited needs and wants, including how goods and services are produced and distributed. Through economics, students examine the relationship between costs and benefits. They develop an understanding of basic economic concepts; economics in history; how economics affects and is affected by the individual; cycles in the economy; financial institutions and government; and international economics and trade. The goal of economic education is to prepare students to make effective decisions as consumers, producers, savers, investors, and as citizens.

Geography: The real crux of geography is understanding our physical Earth and human-environment interaction: knowing why people settle in an area, how they make their living and the resources they use, why they dress or speak the way they do, and what they do for entertainment. A geographically informed person can draw connections between locations of the Earth, recognize complex regional patterns, and appreciate the influence of place on human development.

New Hampshire and United States History: The study of New Hampshire and United States History is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the legacy of our republic, and to develop the empathy and analytical skills needed to participate intelligently and responsibly in our ongoing democratic experiment. Historical study exposes students to the enduring themes and issues of our past and emboldens them to courageously and compassionately meet the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in a state, a country and an interdependent world. Ultimately, the study of history will help students plan and implement responsible actions that support and enhance our collective values.

World History and Contemporary Issues: The study of World History and Contemporary Issues is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in an interdependent, increasingly connected world. Knowledge of past achievements and failures of different peoples and nations provides citizens of the 21st century with a broader context within which to address the many issues facing our nation and the world. World History fosters an appreciation of the roots of our nation's values and the values and perspectives of other peoples. It illustrates how humans have expressed themselves in different surroundings and at different times, revealing the many commonalties and differences shared by the world's peoples past and present.

Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

Technology Education

Information and Communication Technologies Program

9th

Arts Education

Dance: Identify and demonstrate movement elements and skills in performing dance.

Dance: Identify choreographic principles.

Dance: Recognize dance as a way to create and communicate meaning.

Dance: Apply and demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills in dance.

Dance: Recognize and demonstrate dance in various cultures and historical periods.

Dance: Make connections between dance and healthful living.

Dance: Make connections between dance and other disciplines.

Dance: Identify the range of careers in the field of dance.

Music: Sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Perform on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvise melodies, variations, and accompaniments.

Music: Compose and arrange music within specified guidelines.

Music: Read and notate music.

Music: Listen to, analyze, and describe music.

Music: Evaluate music and music performances.

Music: Understand relationships among music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts.

Music: Understand music in relation to history and culture.

Music: Identify the range of careers in the field of music.

Theatre: Students will create theatre through improvising, writing and refining scripts.

Theatre: Students will act by developing, improvising, communicating and sustaining characters.

Theatre: Students will design and produce the technical elements of theatre through artistic interpretation and execution.

Theatre: Students will direct by planning or interpreting works of theatre by organizing and conducting rehearsals.

Theatre: Students will research, evaluate and apply cultural and historical information to make artistic choices.

Theatre: Students will make curriculum connections among theatre, the arts, and other disciplines.

Theatre: Students will analyze, critique and construct meanings from works of theatre.

Theatre: Students will demonstrate an understanding of context by analyzing and comparing theatre in various cultures, historical periods and everyday life.

Theatre: Understand the range of careers in the field of theatre arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Visual Arts: Apply appropriate media, techniques, and processes.

Visual Arts: Identify and apply the elements of visual art and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Select and apply a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas.

Visual Arts: Analyze the visual arts in relation to history and culture.

Visual Arts: Analyze, interpret and evaluate their own and others' artwork.

Visual Arts: Students will make connections among the visual arts, other disciplines, and daily life.

Visual Arts: Understand the range of careers in the field of visual arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Health and PE

Health Education Curriculum Guidelines

Physical Education Curriculum Guidelines

Language Arts

Reading Standards for Literature

Reading Standards for Informational Text

Writing Standards

Speaking and Listening Standards

Language Standards

Mathematics

Mathematical Practices

Number and Quantity

Algebra

Functions

Geometry

Statistics and Probability

Science

Science Process Skills: Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking Skills

Science Process Skills: Unifying Concepts of Science

Science Process Skills: Personal, Social, and Technological Perspectives

Science Process Skills: Science Skills for Information, Communication and Media Literacy

Earth Space Science: The Earth and Earth materials, as we know them today, have developed over long periods of time, through constant change processes.

Earth Space Science: The Earth is part of a solar system, made up of distinct parts, which have temporal and spatial interrelationships.

Earth Space Science: The origin and evolution of galaxies and the universe demonstrate fundamental principles of physical science across vast distances and time.

Earth Space Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Earth Space Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Life Science: All living organisms have identifiable structures and characteristics that allow for survival (organisms, populations, and species).

Life Science: Energy flows and matter recycles through an ecosystem.

Life Science: Groups of organisms show evidence of change over time (e.g. evolution, natural selection, structures, behaviors, and biochemistry).

Life Science: Humans are similar to other species in many ways, and yet are unique among Earth's life forms.

Life Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Life Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Physical Science: All living and nonliving things are composed of matter having characteristic properties that distinguish one substance from another (independent of size/amount of substance).

Physical Science: Energy is necessary for change to occur in matter. Energy can be stored, transferred and transformed, but cannot be destroyed.

Physical Science: The motion of an object is affected by force.

Physical Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Physical Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Writing Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Social Studies

Civics and Governments: The goal of Civics is to educate students to understand the purpose, structure, and functions of government; the political process; the rule of law; and world affairs. Civics builds on a foundation of history, geography, and economics to teach students to become responsible, knowledgeable citizens, committed to participation in public affairs.

Economics: Economics is the study of the allocation and utilization of limited resources to meet society's unlimited needs and wants, including how goods and services are produced and distributed. Through economics, students examine the relationship between costs and benefits. They develop an understanding of basic economic concepts; economics in history; how economics affects and is affected by the individual; cycles in the economy; financial institutions and government; and international economics and trade. The goal of economic education is to prepare students to make effective decisions as consumers, producers, savers, investors, and as citizens.

Geography: The real crux of geography is understanding our physical Earth and human-environment interaction: knowing why people settle in an area, how they make their living and the resources they use, why they dress or speak the way they do, and what they do for entertainment. A geographically informed person can draw connections between locations of the Earth, recognize complex regional patterns, and appreciate the influence of place on human development.

New Hampshire and United States History: The study of New Hampshire and United States History is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the legacy of our republic, and to develop the empathy and analytical skills needed to participate intelligently and responsibly in our ongoing democratic experiment. Historical study exposes students to the enduring themes and issues of our past and emboldens them to courageously and compassionately meet the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in a state, a country and an interdependent world. Ultimately, the study of history will help students plan and implement responsible actions that support and enhance our collective values.

World History and Contemporary Issues: The study of World History and Contemporary Issues is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in an interdependent, increasingly connected world. Knowledge of past achievements and failures of different peoples and nations provides citizens of the 21st century with a broader context within which to address the many issues facing our nation and the world. World History fosters an appreciation of the roots of our nation's values and the values and perspectives of other peoples. It illustrates how humans have expressed themselves in different surroundings and at different times, revealing the many commonalties and differences shared by the world's peoples past and present.

Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

World Languages

French I Course-Level Competencies

French II Course-Level Competencies

French III Course-Level Competencies

French IV Course-Level Competencies

German I Course-Level Competencies

German II Course-Level Competencies

German III Course-Level Competencies

German IV Course-Level Competencies

Latin I Course-Level Competencies

Latin II Course-Level Competencies

Latin III Course-Level Competencies

Spanish I Course-Level Competencies

Spanish II Course-Level Competencies

Spanish III Course-Level Competencies

Spanish IV Course-Level Competencies

Technology Education

Information and Communication Technologies Program

10th

Arts Education

Dance: Identify and demonstrate movement elements and skills in performing dance.

Dance: Identify choreographic principles.

Dance: Recognize dance as a way to create and communicate meaning.

Dance: Apply and demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills in dance.

Dance: Recognize and demonstrate dance in various cultures and historical periods.

Dance: Make connections between dance and healthful living.

Dance: Make connections between dance and other disciplines.

Dance: Identify the range of careers in the field of dance.

Music: Sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Perform on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvise melodies, variations, and accompaniments.

Music: Compose and arrange music within specified guidelines.

Music: Read and notate music.

Music: Listen to, analyze, and describe music.

Music: Evaluate music and music performances.

Music: Understand relationships among music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts.

Music: Understand music in relation to history and culture.

Music: Identify the range of careers in the field of music.

Theatre: Students will create theatre through improvising, writing and refining scripts.

Theatre: Students will act by developing, improvising, communicating and sustaining characters.

Theatre: Students will design and produce the technical elements of theatre through artistic interpretation and execution.

Theatre: Students will direct by planning or interpreting works of theatre by organizing and conducting rehearsals.

Theatre: Students will research, evaluate and apply cultural and historical information to make artistic choices.

Theatre: Students will make curriculum connections among theatre, the arts, and other disciplines.

Theatre: Students will analyze, critique and construct meanings from works of theatre.

Theatre: Students will demonstrate an understanding of context by analyzing and comparing theatre in various cultures, historical periods and everyday life.

Theatre: Understand the range of careers in the field of theatre arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Visual Arts: Apply appropriate media, techniques, and processes.

Visual Arts: Identify and apply the elements of visual art and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Select and apply a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas.

Visual Arts: Analyze the visual arts in relation to history and culture.

Visual Arts: Analyze, interpret and evaluate their own and others' artwork.

Visual Arts: Students will make connections among the visual arts, other disciplines, and daily life.

Visual Arts: Understand the range of careers in the field of visual arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Health and PE

Health Education Curriculum Guidelines

Physical Education Curriculum Guidelines

Language Arts

Reading Standards for Literature

Reading Standards for Informational Text

Writing Standards

Speaking and Listening Standards

Language Standards

Mathematics

Mathematical Practices

Number and Quantity

Algebra

Functions

Geometry

Statistics and Probability

Science

Science Process Skills: Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking Skills

Science Process Skills: Unifying Concepts of Science

Science Process Skills: Personal, Social, and Technological Perspectives

Science Process Skills: Science Skills for Information, Communication and Media Literacy

Earth Space Science: The Earth and Earth materials, as we know them today, have developed over long periods of time, through constant change processes.

Earth Space Science: The Earth is part of a solar system, made up of distinct parts, which have temporal and spatial interrelationships.

Earth Space Science: The origin and evolution of galaxies and the universe demonstrate fundamental principles of physical science across vast distances and time.

Earth Space Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Earth Space Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Life Science: All living organisms have identifiable structures and characteristics that allow for survival (organisms, populations, and species).

Life Science: Energy flows and matter recycles through an ecosystem.

Life Science: Groups of organisms show evidence of change over time (e.g. evolution, natural selection, structures, behaviors, and biochemistry).

Life Science: Humans are similar to other species in many ways, and yet are unique among Earth's life forms.

Life Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Life Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Physical Science: All living and nonliving things are composed of matter having characteristic properties that distinguish one substance from another (independent of size/amount of substance).

Physical Science: Energy is necessary for change to occur in matter. Energy can be stored, transferred and transformed, but cannot be destroyed.

Physical Science: The motion of an object is affected by force.

Physical Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Physical Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Writing Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Social Studies

Civics and Governments: The goal of Civics is to educate students to understand the purpose, structure, and functions of government; the political process; the rule of law; and world affairs. Civics builds on a foundation of history, geography, and economics to teach students to become responsible, knowledgeable citizens, committed to participation in public affairs.

Economics: Economics is the study of the allocation and utilization of limited resources to meet society's unlimited needs and wants, including how goods and services are produced and distributed. Through economics, students examine the relationship between costs and benefits. They develop an understanding of basic economic concepts; economics in history; how economics affects and is affected by the individual; cycles in the economy; financial institutions and government; and international economics and trade. The goal of economic education is to prepare students to make effective decisions as consumers, producers, savers, investors, and as citizens.

Geography: The real crux of geography is understanding our physical Earth and human-environment interaction: knowing why people settle in an area, how they make their living and the resources they use, why they dress or speak the way they do, and what they do for entertainment. A geographically informed person can draw connections between locations of the Earth, recognize complex regional patterns, and appreciate the influence of place on human development.

New Hampshire and United States History: The study of New Hampshire and United States History is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the legacy of our republic, and to develop the empathy and analytical skills needed to participate intelligently and responsibly in our ongoing democratic experiment. Historical study exposes students to the enduring themes and issues of our past and emboldens them to courageously and compassionately meet the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in a state, a country and an interdependent world. Ultimately, the study of history will help students plan and implement responsible actions that support and enhance our collective values.

World History and Contemporary Issues: The study of World History and Contemporary Issues is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in an interdependent, increasingly connected world. Knowledge of past achievements and failures of different peoples and nations provides citizens of the 21st century with a broader context within which to address the many issues facing our nation and the world. World History fosters an appreciation of the roots of our nation's values and the values and perspectives of other peoples. It illustrates how humans have expressed themselves in different surroundings and at different times, revealing the many commonalties and differences shared by the world's peoples past and present.

Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

World Languages

French I Course-Level Competencies

French II Course-Level Competencies

French III Course-Level Competencies

French IV Course-Level Competencies

German I Course-Level Competencies

German II Course-Level Competencies

German III Course-Level Competencies

German IV Course-Level Competencies

Latin I Course-Level Competencies

Latin II Course-Level Competencies

Latin III Course-Level Competencies

Spanish I Course-Level Competencies

Spanish II Course-Level Competencies

Spanish III Course-Level Competencies

Spanish IV Course-Level Competencies

Technology Education

Information and Communication Technologies Program

11th

Arts Education

Dance: Identify and demonstrate movement elements and skills in performing dance.

Dance: Identify choreographic principles.

Dance: Recognize dance as a way to create and communicate meaning.

Dance: Apply and demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills in dance.

Dance: Recognize and demonstrate dance in various cultures and historical periods.

Dance: Make connections between dance and healthful living.

Dance: Make connections between dance and other disciplines.

Dance: Identify the range of careers in the field of dance.

Music: Sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Perform on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvise melodies, variations, and accompaniments.

Music: Compose and arrange music within specified guidelines.

Music: Read and notate music.

Music: Listen to, analyze, and describe music.

Music: Evaluate music and music performances.

Music: Understand relationships among music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts.

Music: Understand music in relation to history and culture.

Music: Identify the range of careers in the field of music.

Theatre: Students will create theatre through improvising, writing and refining scripts.

Theatre: Students will act by developing, improvising, communicating and sustaining characters.

Theatre: Students will design and produce the technical elements of theatre through artistic interpretation and execution.

Theatre: Students will direct by planning or interpreting works of theatre by organizing and conducting rehearsals.

Theatre: Students will research, evaluate and apply cultural and historical information to make artistic choices.

Theatre: Students will make curriculum connections among theatre, the arts, and other disciplines.

Theatre: Students will analyze, critique and construct meanings from works of theatre.

Theatre: Students will demonstrate an understanding of context by analyzing and comparing theatre in various cultures, historical periods and everyday life.

Theatre: Understand the range of careers in the field of theatre arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Visual Arts: Apply appropriate media, techniques, and processes.

Visual Arts: Identify and apply the elements of visual art and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Select and apply a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas.

Visual Arts: Analyze the visual arts in relation to history and culture.

Visual Arts: Analyze, interpret and evaluate their own and others' artwork.

Visual Arts: Students will make connections among the visual arts, other disciplines, and daily life.

Visual Arts: Understand the range of careers in the field of visual arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Health and PE

Health Education Curriculum Guidelines

Physical Education Curriculum Guidelines

Language Arts

Reading Standards for Literature

Reading Standards for Informational Text

Writing Standards

Speaking and Listening Standards

Language Standards

Mathematics

Mathematical Practices

Number and Quantity

Algebra

Functions

Geometry

Statistics and Probability

Science

Science Process Skills: Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking Skills

Science Process Skills: Unifying Concepts of Science

Science Process Skills: Personal, Social, and Technological Perspectives

Science Process Skills: Science Skills for Information, Communication and Media Literacy

Earth Space Science: The Earth and Earth materials, as we know them today, have developed over long periods of time, through constant change processes.

Earth Space Science: The Earth is part of a solar system, made up of distinct parts, which have temporal and spatial interrelationships.

Earth Space Science: The origin and evolution of galaxies and the universe demonstrate fundamental principles of physical science across vast distances and time.

Earth Space Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Earth Space Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Life Science: All living organisms have identifiable structures and characteristics that allow for survival (organisms, populations, and species).

Life Science: Energy flows and matter recycles through an ecosystem.

Life Science: Groups of organisms show evidence of change over time (e.g. evolution, natural selection, structures, behaviors, and biochemistry).

Life Science: Humans are similar to other species in many ways, and yet are unique among Earth's life forms.

Life Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Life Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Physical Science: All living and nonliving things are composed of matter having characteristic properties that distinguish one substance from another (independent of size/amount of substance).

Physical Science: Energy is necessary for change to occur in matter. Energy can be stored, transferred and transformed, but cannot be destroyed.

Physical Science: The motion of an object is affected by force.

Physical Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Physical Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Writing Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Social Studies

Civics and Governments: The goal of Civics is to educate students to understand the purpose, structure, and functions of government; the political process; the rule of law; and world affairs. Civics builds on a foundation of history, geography, and economics to teach students to become responsible, knowledgeable citizens, committed to participation in public affairs.

Economics: Economics is the study of the allocation and utilization of limited resources to meet society's unlimited needs and wants, including how goods and services are produced and distributed. Through economics, students examine the relationship between costs and benefits. They develop an understanding of basic economic concepts; economics in history; how economics affects and is affected by the individual; cycles in the economy; financial institutions and government; and international economics and trade. The goal of economic education is to prepare students to make effective decisions as consumers, producers, savers, investors, and as citizens.

Geography: The real crux of geography is understanding our physical Earth and human-environment interaction: knowing why people settle in an area, how they make their living and the resources they use, why they dress or speak the way they do, and what they do for entertainment. A geographically informed person can draw connections between locations of the Earth, recognize complex regional patterns, and appreciate the influence of place on human development.

New Hampshire and United States History: The study of New Hampshire and United States History is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the legacy of our republic, and to develop the empathy and analytical skills needed to participate intelligently and responsibly in our ongoing democratic experiment. Historical study exposes students to the enduring themes and issues of our past and emboldens them to courageously and compassionately meet the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in a state, a country and an interdependent world. Ultimately, the study of history will help students plan and implement responsible actions that support and enhance our collective values.

World History and Contemporary Issues: The study of World History and Contemporary Issues is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in an interdependent, increasingly connected world. Knowledge of past achievements and failures of different peoples and nations provides citizens of the 21st century with a broader context within which to address the many issues facing our nation and the world. World History fosters an appreciation of the roots of our nation's values and the values and perspectives of other peoples. It illustrates how humans have expressed themselves in different surroundings and at different times, revealing the many commonalties and differences shared by the world's peoples past and present.

Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

World Languages

French I Course-Level Competencies

French II Course-Level Competencies

French III Course-Level Competencies

French IV Course-Level Competencies

German I Course-Level Competencies

German II Course-Level Competencies

German III Course-Level Competencies

German IV Course-Level Competencies

Latin I Course-Level Competencies

Latin II Course-Level Competencies

Latin III Course-Level Competencies

Spanish I Course-Level Competencies

Spanish II Course-Level Competencies

Spanish III Course-Level Competencies

Spanish IV Course-Level Competencies

Technology Education

Information and Communication Technologies Program

12th

Arts Education

Dance: Identify and demonstrate movement elements and skills in performing dance.

Dance: Identify choreographic principles.

Dance: Recognize dance as a way to create and communicate meaning.

Dance: Apply and demonstrate critical and creative thinking skills in dance.

Dance: Recognize and demonstrate dance in various cultures and historical periods.

Dance: Make connections between dance and healthful living.

Dance: Make connections between dance and other disciplines.

Dance: Identify the range of careers in the field of dance.

Music: Sing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Perform on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music.

Music: Improvise melodies, variations, and accompaniments.

Music: Compose and arrange music within specified guidelines.

Music: Read and notate music.

Music: Listen to, analyze, and describe music.

Music: Evaluate music and music performances.

Music: Understand relationships among music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts.

Music: Understand music in relation to history and culture.

Music: Identify the range of careers in the field of music.

Theatre: Students will create theatre through improvising, writing and refining scripts.

Theatre: Students will act by developing, improvising, communicating and sustaining characters.

Theatre: Students will design and produce the technical elements of theatre through artistic interpretation and execution.

Theatre: Students will direct by planning or interpreting works of theatre by organizing and conducting rehearsals.

Theatre: Students will research, evaluate and apply cultural and historical information to make artistic choices.

Theatre: Students will make curriculum connections among theatre, the arts, and other disciplines.

Theatre: Students will analyze, critique and construct meanings from works of theatre.

Theatre: Students will demonstrate an understanding of context by analyzing and comparing theatre in various cultures, historical periods and everyday life.

Theatre: Understand the range of careers in the field of theatre arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Visual Arts: Apply appropriate media, techniques, and processes.

Visual Arts: Identify and apply the elements of visual art and principles of design.

Visual Arts: Select and apply a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas.

Visual Arts: Analyze the visual arts in relation to history and culture.

Visual Arts: Analyze, interpret and evaluate their own and others' artwork.

Visual Arts: Students will make connections among the visual arts, other disciplines, and daily life.

Visual Arts: Understand the range of careers in the field of visual arts and identify careers associated with this field.

Health and PE

Health Education Curriculum Guidelines

Physical Education Curriculum Guidelines

Language Arts

Reading Standards for Literature

Reading Standards for Informational Text

Writing Standards

Speaking and Listening Standards

Language Standards

Mathematics

Mathematical Practices

Number and Quantity

Algebra

Functions

Geometry

Statistics and Probability

Science

Science Process Skills: Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking Skills

Science Process Skills: Unifying Concepts of Science

Science Process Skills: Personal, Social, and Technological Perspectives

Science Process Skills: Science Skills for Information, Communication and Media Literacy

Earth Space Science: The Earth and Earth materials, as we know them today, have developed over long periods of time, through constant change processes.

Earth Space Science: The Earth is part of a solar system, made up of distinct parts, which have temporal and spatial interrelationships.

Earth Space Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Earth Space Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Life Science: All living organisms have identifiable structures and characteristics that allow for survival (organisms, populations, and species).

Life Science: Groups of organisms show evidence of change over time (e.g. evolution, natural selection, structures, behaviors, and biochemistry).

Life Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Life Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Physical Science: All living and nonliving things are composed of matter having characteristic properties that distinguish one substance from another (independent of size/amount of substance).

Physical Science: Energy is necessary for change to occur in matter. Energy can be stored, transferred and transformed, but cannot be destroyed.

Physical Science: The motion of an object is affected by force.

Physical Science: The growth of scientific knowledge in Physical Science has been advanced through the development of technology and is used (alone or in combination with other sciences) to identify, understand and solve local and global issues.

Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Writing Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

Social Studies

Civics and Governments: The goal of Civics is to educate students to understand the purpose, structure, and functions of government; the political process; the rule of law; and world affairs. Civics builds on a foundation of history, geography, and economics to teach students to become responsible, knowledgeable citizens, committed to participation in public affairs.

Economics: Economics is the study of the allocation and utilization of limited resources to meet society's unlimited needs and wants, including how goods and services are produced and distributed. Through economics, students examine the relationship between costs and benefits. They develop an understanding of basic economic concepts; economics in history; how economics affects and is affected by the individual; cycles in the economy; financial institutions and government; and international economics and trade. The goal of economic education is to prepare students to make effective decisions as consumers, producers, savers, investors, and as citizens.

Geography: The real crux of geography is understanding our physical Earth and human-environment interaction: knowing why people settle in an area, how they make their living and the resources they use, why they dress or speak the way they do, and what they do for entertainment. A geographically informed person can draw connections between locations of the Earth, recognize complex regional patterns, and appreciate the influence of place on human development.

New Hampshire and United States History: The study of New Hampshire and United States History is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the legacy of our republic, and to develop the empathy and analytical skills needed to participate intelligently and responsibly in our ongoing democratic experiment. Historical study exposes students to the enduring themes and issues of our past and emboldens them to courageously and compassionately meet the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in a state, a country and an interdependent world. Ultimately, the study of history will help students plan and implement responsible actions that support and enhance our collective values.

World History and Contemporary Issues: The study of World History and Contemporary Issues is important in helping citizens understand and appreciate the contemporary challenges they will face as individuals in an interdependent, increasingly connected world. Knowledge of past achievements and failures of different peoples and nations provides citizens of the 21st century with a broader context within which to address the many issues facing our nation and the world. World History fosters an appreciation of the roots of our nation's values and the values and perspectives of other peoples. It illustrates how humans have expressed themselves in different surroundings and at different times, revealing the many commonalties and differences shared by the world's peoples past and present.

Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies

World Languages

French I Course-Level Competencies

French II Course-Level Competencies

French III Course-Level Competencies

French IV Course-Level Competencies

German I Course-Level Competencies

German II Course-Level Competencies

German III Course-Level Competencies

German IV Course-Level Competencies

Latin I Course-Level Competencies

Latin II Course-Level Competencies

Latin III Course-Level Competencies

Spanish I Course-Level Competencies

Spanish II Course-Level Competencies

Spanish III Course-Level Competencies

Spanish IV Course-Level Competencies

Technology Education

Information and Communication Technologies Program

Search Standards