Frederick Douglass’s Speech “The Meaning of the Fourth of July for the Negro”

This Frederick Douglass’s Speech “The Meaning of the Fourth of July for the Negro” lesson plan also includes:

"The Fourth of July is yours, not mine." When Fredrick Douglass said these words in 1852, how did advocates of slavery, as well as Douglass' antislavery audience, react? Here is an excellent instructional activity not only for analyzing Douglass' powerful message, but also for recognizing the importance of perspective in general historical analysis.

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CCSS: Designed
Instructional Ideas

  • The resource includes descriptions of excellent teaching activities (i.e. "Chalk Talk" and SOAPSTone) that can be translated to other lessons
Classroom Considerations

  • Pupils should have general knowledge about the abolitionist movement in the United States in the time leading up to the Civil War, as well as the role of Frederick Douglass, before beginning this lesson
Pros

  • Detailed informational texts, such as introduction to slavery in the nineteenth century, basic facts about Douglass' speech, and a SOAPSTone worksheet
  • Document can be downloaded and edited to print according to your preferences
  • Includes homework assignment for responding to Douglass' speech
Cons

  • None
Common Core