Ecoregions of Texas

3rd - 8th
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Students map the ecoregions in Texas and illustrate the vegetation native to the region. They will use their maps to investigate why prehistoric hunter-gatherers might have decided to live in one area over another, such as the ancient Gault site - home north of Austin, Texas.

Resource Details

Subjects
Life Science
Instructional Design
Inquiry-Based Learning
Includes
Worksheet

The Neolithic Revolution

With the abundance of food products we can easily access in our society today, it is easy to forget the toll this can take on our global environment. Young learners will discover how the transition to agriculture and domesticated living from nomadic hunter-gatherer societies would also come to mean intensive exploitation of land. This is a great way to combine environmental study or Earth Day activities with a social studies lesson plan on the Agricultural Revolution!

Ecoregions of Texas

Seventh graders discuss why hunter-gatherers might have favored certain areas in which to live. In pairs, they research specific regions to examine in depth. Students present their eco-region vegetation findings (in this case Central Texas) with the class and speculate why hunter-gatherers were attracted to this particular site.

Texas Commemorative Maps: Honoring Our Past

To celebrate Texas, groups plan and create a commemorative map for a topic or theme in Texas history. The richly detailed plan and the approach could easily be adapted to any state. Samples are included.

Discovering Prehistoric Trails

Eighth graders examine prehistoric terrain. In this geography lesson, 8th graders discover necessary resources for settlers. Students work in small groups to create a trail crossing the state of Kansas.

Living in the Oak Woodlands: Early People of the Jewett Mine Area

Students examine the archeology and native peoples of the Jewett Mine area of Texas. Using a map, they explain the economic patterns of the native groups and how the geography of the area affected activities. They compare and contrast the types of technology used in the past to those used in the future. After reading primary sources, they draw conclusions and share them with the class.

My How Things Have Changed

Eighth graders discuss the impact geography had on hunter-gatherer societies, their toolmaking. They work in groups to create a Web page that links pictures of artifacts to explanations about what the artifact tell us about the lives of the people who used them.

The Agricultural Revolution

Rather than simply define the agricultural revolution, invite your learners to consider the advantages and disadvantages that agriculture has brought to humanity as a whole. John Green begins this first episode of this series by illustrating early humans as foragers and hunters, and progresses to a discussion of why the agricultural revolution occurred and what implications this has had on civilization and the environment.

Native Americans at Rose Bay

Students examine the Timken Native Americans of the 1400s and their culture of hunter-gatherers. They study the necessary vocabulary using a number of activities.

Bound For Texas

Students examine factors that motivated immigrants to move to Texas. They locate features on the Texas bird's-eye view website, and develop an art or writing project either from a townsperson's or immigrant's perspective.

Texas Transportation

Students examine the effects of transportation on the settlement of Texas. They read and discuss articles, view Wichita Falls and Abilene on the Texas Bird's-Eye View website, and analyze a Frederic Remington painting.

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