Pea Plant Punnett Square Worksheet

7th - 12th
804 Downloads

How often do you find a science worksheet that comes with separate teacher's instructions? Here is one of those rare instances. Goals and objectives, materials, and evaluation guidelines precede the actual assignment. Biology leaners complete Punnett squares, identify genotype and phenotype, and calculate ratios. 

Resource Details

Subjects
Life Science

Human Traits-Punnett Squares

In this human traits worksheet, learners use Punnett squares to determine the probability of genotypes and phenotypes for offspring. They also answer conclusion questions by completing simple monohybrid crosses.

Teacher Preparation Notes on Genetics

Students explore genetics through various hands-on activities. In this biology lesson, students predict the probability of offspring genotypes and phenotypes using the Punnett Square. They explain the causes of genetic abnormalities.

Tracing a Genetic Disorder in a Family

In this genetic disorder worksheet, students understand how genetic diseases are passed down from parents to offspring. Students use Punnett squares to explain how a disorder is inherited. This worksheet has 10 short answer questions.

Peas In A Pod: Mendelian Genetics

Learners complete a series of lessons where they learn about the basics of genetics, fill out Punnett Squares correctly, and solve reality based problems. In this genetics lesson plan, students have worksheets that are provided.

Dihybrid Cross Punnett Squares

In this dihybrid cross worksheet, students complete two punnett squares for the cross of two traits. They determine the genotypes, phenotypes and phenotypic ratios of the offspring.

Punnett Square Fun

The topics in the previous video about dominant and recessive traits are continued here as Sal Khan explains incomplete dominance, the randomness of genotypes and phenotypes, and covers how to calculate probabilities using Punnett squares for one or multiple traits.

Dare to be Punnett Square

Eighth graders become familiar with Punnett squares, specifically purpose, application and interpretation. Key terms from previous lessons (included below) are reviewed/reinforced before data is applied to a Punnett square and interpreted.

SpongeBob RoundPants? What's the Chance?

Dive down to Bikini Bottom for a fantastic lesson on heredity! High school scientists make phenotype predictions for various characters based on given dominant and recessive traits. Use the PowerPoint here to review this concept before splitting learners into small groups. They experiment with probability using a coin toss, organizing findings on a worksheet (linked). Next, they conduct a virtual lab to practice completing Punnett Squares and explore another interactive site with a quiz. Synthesize their skills with two Sponge Bob worksheets which, after completed by all groups, can be presented in a jigsaw fashion. Use the final quiz here as assessment.

Punnett Squares

Eighth graders take a short quiz on genotypes and phenotypes. As a class, they are introduced to the concept of Punnett Squares and listen to a description of Gregor Mendel's pea experiment. In groups, they complete Punnett Squares to determine the probability of an offspring having certain traits. To end the instructional activity, they complete a problem to determine the correct combination of genes related to hairless dogs.

How Mendel's Pea Plants Helped Us Understand Genetics

A brief animation introduces heredity to your beginning biologists. They will meet Gregor Mendel's green and yellow peas, dominant and recessive traits, homozygous and heterozygous alleles, and Punnett squares. In this cartoon animation, the peas all have arms, legs, and facial features. Seeing the little pea families makes an endearing introduction to heredity concepts!

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