Living on Your Own

This Living on Your Own unit also includes:

Every teen dreams of living independently, but often without thinking about the details and costs involved with moving out. Three lessons in a unit about living on your own focus on moving costs, fixed and flexible costs associated with a new apartment, finding a roommate, and signing a rental agreement.

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Instructional Ideas

  • Include in an economics class or social studies lesson
  • Host a seminar for graduating seniors, covering the basics of moving out and living independently with the resources included in the lesson
  • Some instructions on finding specific figures are vague (ask your parents, look online, etc.), so you could provide paper or electronic examples of apartments to rent, electric bills, roommate listings, etc
  • After pupils complete the unit, invite learners from other classes to listen to their presentations and ask questions about what they have learned
  • Weave the lesson throughout a week, a month, or the school year or semester, prompting simulated roommate pairs to think about specific economic or interpersonal situations as they arise
Classroom Considerations

  • The publisher is from Canada, so all of the reference websites and links include costs of living and processes that are specific to Canada; if you are from another country, consider replacing the resources with more relevant figures and websites
Pros

  • Includes graphic organizers, an assessment, guiding discussion questions, and worksheets
  • Comes with links to helpful resources, including websites about tenant and landlord rights, rental agreements, costs of living, and finding a roommate
  • Provides real-world exposure to young people who may not know about any of the aspects of renting an apartment
Cons

  • None