After Charlottesville: Contested History and the Fight against Bigotry

This After Charlottesville: Contested History and the Fight against Bigotry lesson plan also includes:

History doesn't always reflect all sides. Academics discover how the remembered history of the Civil War differs for White and African Americans. The instructional activity explores how Civil War monuments and celebrations have racist connotations for African Americans. Scholars write journal entries, participate in group discussion, read documents, and watch a video to discuss the social issues facing Americans today regarding contesting history and how to change it going forward. 

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Instructional Ideas
  • Compare the events of 2017 mentioned in the resource with current racially inspired events 
  • Create a visual board that represents the conflicting history of the Civil War 
Classroom Considerations
  • The lesson has a companion unit, After Charlottesville: Public Memory and Contested Monuments
  • This resource is only available on an unencrypted HTTP website. It should be fine for general use, but don’t use it to share any personally identifiable information
Pros
  • The lesson is great to use during Black History Month
  • Resource includes extension activities to reinforce key concepts in the lesson 
Cons
  • None