Honesty is the Best Policy

K - 2nd
742 Downloads

Students define honesty. In this character education lesson, students read the book, The Boy Who Cried Wolf, and discuss ways that the character was dishonest. Students act out the story as if the character was behaving honestly.

Resource Details

Subjects
Anthropology
Instructional Designs
Simulation
Includes
Bibliography
Language
English
Duration
30 mins
Author/Publisher
Lori Woods
Addresses
Standards

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Students analyze a book's characters and create a scrapbook to print and save. In this on line interactive characterization lesson plan, students identify character traits and gain a deeper understanding of a book's characters.

Split Character Studies in Crime and Punishment

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Second graders will read and demonstrate comprehension using a variety of strategies. They will make predictions based on title, cover, illustrations, and text. Also the identifying of important story elements (main character, setting, events) are taught.

Don't Believe the Type: Internet Ethics

What is Internet fraud? Explore Internet ethics and engage in a collaborative discussion. In order to create a Guide to Internet Honesty, learners read and discuss the article "A Beautiful Life, A Tragic Death, a Fraud Exposed." Then they participate in a group discussion on Internet ethics.

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Featured Testimonial


Lori V.
Lesson Planet has given me great ideas for 3rd grade science hands-on activities! I even got a note from one of my principals observing my class while I was using one of the lessons that I found through this website; she LOVED what I was doing and that the kids were excited and very involved.
Lori V.
Houston, TX