Developing Media Literacy

To protect young people from questionable content, many schools limit access. This resource suggests that because learners can so readily avail themselves to unrestricted Internet access, it is vital for 21st century learners to develop media literacy skills that enable them to evaluate a site and its content. Using the provided web site evaluation form, groups compare the content of a pair of web sites that present radically different points of view on either the work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. or the history of the Holocaust and World War II. 

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CCSS: Adaptable
Instructional Ideas

  • Check to see if your school permits access to "Martin Luther King, Jr. Online: An Historical Examination" and to "The Institute for Historical Review"
  • Have groups investigate sites that claim to fact-check the validity of various statements
Classroom Considerations

  • Some browser block access to www.mlking.org and to www.ihr.org due to their content; therefore, preview these sties to determine if appropriate to your learning situation
Pros

  • The four-page resource includes a description of the activity, links to the web sites, and the web site evaluation form
Cons

  • No information is provided about how to fact-check the claims made of the web site